Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 432 pages of information about Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres.

PREFACE

   I. Saint Michiel de la mer del peril
  ii.  La chanson de Roland
 iii.  The merveille
  IV.  Normandy and the ile de france
   V. Towers and portals
  vi.  The Virgin of Chartres
 VII.  Roses and apses
VIII.  The twelfth-century glass
  IX.  The legendary windows
   X. The court of the queen of heaven
  XI.  The three queens
 xii.  Nicolette and Marion
XIII.  Les miracles de notre dame
 XIV.  Abelard
  xv.  The mystics
 XVI.  Saint Thomas Aquinas

Preface

[December, 1904.]

Some old Elizabethan play or poem contains the lines:—­

. . .  Who reads me, when I am ashes,
Is my son in wishes . . . . . . . . .

The relationship, between reader and writer, of son and father, may have existed in Queen Elizabeth’s time, but is much too close to be true for ours.  The utmost that any writer could hope of his readers now is that they should consent to regard themselves as nephews, and even then he would expect only a more or less civil refusal from most of them.  Indeed, if he had reached a certain age, he would have observed that nephews, as a social class, no longer read at all, and that there is only one familiar instance recorded of a nephew who read his uncle.  The exception tends rather to support the rule, since it needed a Macaulay to produce, and two volumes to record it.  Finally, the metre does not permit it.  One may not say:  “Who reads me, when I am ashes, is my nephew in wishes.”

The same objections do not apply to the word “niece.”  The change restores the verse, and, to a very great degree, the fact.  Nieces have been known to read in early youth, and in some cases may have read their uncles.  The relationship, too, is convenient and easy, capable of being anything or nothing, at the will of either party, like a Mohammedan or Polynesian or American marriage.  No valid objection can be offered to this choice in the verse.  Niece let it be!

The following lines, then, are written for nieces, or for those who are willing, for those, to be nieces in wish.  For convenience of travel in France, where hotels, in out-of-the-way places, are sometimes wanting in space as well as luxury, the nieces shall count as one only.  As many more may come as like, but one niece is enough for the uncle to talk to, and one niece is much more likely than two to listen.  One niece is also more likely than two to carry a kodak and take interest in it, since she has nothing else, except her uncle, to interest her, and instances occur when she takes interest neither in the uncle nor in the journey.  One cannot assume, even in a niece, too emotional a nature, but one may assume a kodak.

The party, then, with such variations of detail as may suit its tastes, has sailed from New York, let us say, early in June for an entire summer in France.  One pleasant June morning it has landed at Cherbourg or Havre and takes the train across Normandy to Pontorson, where, with the evening light, the tourists drive along the chaussee, over the sands or through the tide, till they stop at Madame Poulard’s famous hotel within the Gate of the Mount.

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Project Gutenberg
Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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