Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 125 pages of information about Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.

But though you should rank me in this class of fools, I cannot forbear communicating a remark that occurs to me, from the history of the religious and irreligious scepticism with which you have entertained us.  It appears to me, that there are strong symptoms of priestcraft in the whole progress of this affair.  During ignorant ages, such as those which followed the dissolution of the ancient schools, the priests perceived, that Atheism, Deism, or heresy of any kind, could only proceed from the presumptuous questioning of received opinions, and from a belief that human reason was equal to every thing.  Education had then a mighty influence over the minds of men, and was almost equal in force to those suggestions of the senses and common understanding, by which the most determined sceptic must allow himself to be governed.  But at present, when the influence of education is much diminished, and men, from a more open commerce of the world, have learned to compare the popular principles of different nations and ages, our sagacious divines have changed their whole system of philosophy, and talk the language of stoics, PLATONISTS, and PERIPATETICS, not that of PYRRHONIANS and academics.  If we distrust human reason, we have now no other principle to lead us into religion.  Thus, sceptics in one age, dogmatists in another; whichever system best suits the purpose of these reverend gentlemen, in giving them an ascendant over mankind, they are sure to make it their favourite principle, and established tenet.

It is very natural, said cleanthes, for men to embrace those principles, by which they find they can best defend their doctrines; nor need we have any recourse to priestcraft to account for so reasonable an expedient.  And, surely nothing can afford a stronger presumption, that any set of principles are true, and ought to be embraced, than to observe that they tend to the confirmation of true religion, and serve to confound the cavils of Atheists, Libertines, and Freethinkers of all denominations.

PART 2

I must own, cleanthes, said DEMEA, that nothing can more surprise me, than the light in which you have all along put this argument.  By the whole tenor of your discourse, one would imagine that you were maintaining the Being of a God, against the cavils of Atheists and Infidels; and were necessitated to become a champion for that fundamental principle of all religion.  But this, I hope, is not by any means a question among us.  No man, no man at least of common sense, I am persuaded, ever entertained a serious doubt with regard to a truth so certain and self-evident.  The question is not concerning the being, but the nature of God.  This, I affirm, from the infirmities of human understanding, to be altogether incomprehensible and unknown to us.  The essence of that supreme Mind, his attributes, the manner of his existence, the very nature of his

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Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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