The Hermit and the Wild Woman eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 184 pages of information about The Hermit and the Wild Woman.

“But,” she continued, “you need not fear my bringing scandal on your holy retreat, for by the arts of the same wise woman my own wound is well-nigh healed, and tonight at sunset I set forth on my travels.”

The Hermit’s heart grew heavy as she spoke, and it seemed to him that her own look was sorrowful.  And suddenly his perplexities were lifted from him, and he saw what was God’s purpose with the Wild Woman.

“Why,” said he, “do you fly from this place, where you are safe from molestation, and can look to the saving of your soul?  Is it that your feet weary for the road, and your spirits are heavy for lack of worldly discourse?”

She replied that she had no wish to travel, and felt no repugnance to solitude.  “But,” said she, “I must go forth to beg my bread, since in this wilderness there is none but yourself to feed me; and moreover, when it is known that I have healed the goatherd, curious folk and scandal-mongers may seek me out, and, learning whence I come, drag me back to the cloister.”

Then the Hermit answered her and said:  “In the early days, when the faith of Christ was first preached, there were holy women who fled to the desert and lived there in solitude, to the glory of God and the edification of their sex.  If you are minded to embrace so austere a life, contenting you with such sustenance as the wilderness yields, and wearing out your days in prayer and vigil, it may be that you shall make amends for the great sin you have committed, and live and die in the peace of the Lord Jesus.”

He spoke thus, knowing that if she left him and returned to her roaming, hunger and fear might drive her to fresh sin; whereas in a life of penance and reclusion her eyes might be opened to her iniquity, and her soul snatched back from ruin.

He saw that his words moved her, and she seemed about to consent, and embrace a life of holiness; but suddenly she fell silent, and looked down on the valley at their feet.

“A stream flows in the glen below us,” she said.  “Do you forbid me to bathe in it in the heat of summer?”

“It is not I that forbid you, my daughter, but the laws of God,” said the Hermit; “yet see how miraculously heaven protects you—­for in the hot season, when your lust is upon you, our stream runs dry, and temptation will be removed from you.  Moreover on these heights there is no excess of heat to madden the body, but always, before dawn and at the angelus, a cool breeze which refreshes it like water.”

And after thinking long on this, and again receiving his promise not to betray her, the Wild Woman agreed to embrace a life of reclusion; and the Hermit fell on his knees, worshipping God and rejoicing to think that, if he saved his sister from sin, his own term of probation would be shortened.

VI

Thereafter for two years the Hermit and the Wild Woman lived side by side, meeting together to pray on the great feast-days of the year, but on all other days dwelling apart, engaged in pious practices.

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The Hermit and the Wild Woman from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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