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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 669 pages of information about Lavengro; the Scholar, the Gypsy, the Priest.

’And it was well that he made me this present, for without it I should have been penniless, having contracted rather expensive habits during the time that I lived with the young baronet.  I now determined to visit my parents, whom I had not seen for years.  I found them in good health, and, after staying with them for two months, I returned again in the direction of town, walking, in order to see the country.  On the second day of my journey, not being used to such fatigue, I fell ill at a great inn on the north road, and there I continued for some weeks till I recovered, but by that time my money was entirely spent.  By living at the inn I had contracted an acquaintance with the master and the people, and become accustomed to inn life.  As I thought that I might find some difficulty in procuring any desirable situation in London, owing to my late connection with literature, I determined to remain where I was, provided my services would be accepted.  I offered them to the master, who, finding I knew something of horses, engaged me as a postilion.  I have remained there since.  You have now heard my story.

’Stay, you shan’t say that I told my tale without a per—­peroration.  What shall it be?  Oh, I remember something which will serve for one.  As I was driving my chaise some weeks ago, I saw standing at the gate of an avenue, which led up to an old mansion, a figure which I thought I recognised.  I looked at it attentively, and the figure, as I passed, looked at me; whether it remembered me I do not know, but I recognised the face it showed me full well.

’If it was not the identical face of the red-haired priest whom I had seen at Rome, may I catch cold!

’Young gentleman, I will now take a spell on your blanket—­young lady, good-night.’

Footnotes: 

{5} ’In Cornwall are the best gentlemen.’—­Corn.  Prov.

{19} Norwegian ells—­about eight feet.

{143} Klopstock.

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