Tales of Men and Ghosts eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 278 pages of information about Tales of Men and Ghosts.

His wife felt a sting of compunction.  Theoretically, she deprecated the American wife’s detachment from her husband’s professional interests, but in practice she had always found it difficult to fix her attention on Boyne’s report of the transactions in which his varied interests involved him.  Besides, she had felt from the first that, in a community where the amenities of living could be obtained only at the cost of efforts as arduous as her husband’s professional labors, such brief leisure as they could command should be used as an escape from immediate preoccupations, a flight to the life they always dreamed of living.  Once or twice, now that this new life had actually drawn its magic circle about them, she had asked herself if she had done right; but hitherto such conjectures had been no more than the retrospective excursions of an active fancy.  Now, for the first time, it startled her a little to find how little she knew of the material foundation on which her happiness was built.

She glanced again at her husband, and was reassured by the composure of his face; yet she felt the need of more definite grounds for her reassurance.

“But doesn’t this suit worry you?  Why have you never spoken to me about it?”

He answered both questions at once:  “I didn’t speak of it at first because it did worry me—­annoyed me, rather.  But it’s all ancient history now.  Your correspondent must have got hold of a back number of the ‘Sentinel.’”

She felt a quick thrill of relief.  “You mean it’s over?  He’s lost his case?”

There was a just perceptible delay in Boyne’s reply.  “The suit’s been withdrawn—­that’s all.”

But she persisted, as if to exonerate herself from the inward charge of being too easily put off.  “Withdrawn because he saw he had no chance?”

“Oh, he had no chance,” Boyne answered.

She was still struggling with a dimly felt perplexity at the back of her thoughts.

“How long ago was it withdrawn?”

He paused, as if with a slight return of his former uncertainty.  “I’ve just had the news now; but I’ve been expecting it.”

“Just now—­in one of your letters?”

“Yes; in one of my letters.”

She made no answer, and was aware only, after a short interval of waiting, that he had risen, and strolling across the room, had placed himself on the sofa at her side.  She felt him, as he did so, pass an arm about her, she felt his hand seek hers and clasp it, and turning slowly, drawn by the warmth of his cheek, she met the smiling clearness of his eyes.

“It’s all right—­it’s all right?” she questioned, through the flood of her dissolving doubts; and “I give you my word it never was righter!” he laughed back at her, holding her close.

III

One of the strangest things she was afterward to recall out of all the next day’s incredible strangeness was the sudden and complete recovery of her sense of security.

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Project Gutenberg
Tales of Men and Ghosts from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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