The Rainbow and the Rose eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 46 pages of information about The Rainbow and the Rose.

IV.

“OUT OF THE FULNESS OF THE HEART THE MOUTH SPEAKETH.”

In answer to those who have said that English Poets give no personal love to their country.

England, my country, austere in the clamorous council of nations,
Set in the seat of the mighty, wielding the sword of the strong,
Have we but sung of your glory, firm in eternal foundations? 
Are not your woods and your meadows the core of our heart and our song? 
O dear fields of my country, grass growing green, glowing golden,
Green in the patience of winter, gold in the pageant of spring,
Oaks and young larches awaking, wind-flowers and violets blowing,
What, if God sets us to singing, what save you shall we sing? 
Who but our England is fair through the veil of her poets’ praises,
What but the pastoral face, the fruitful, beautiful breast? 
Are not your poets’ meadows starred with the English daisies? 
Were not the wings of their song-birds fledged in an English nest? 
Songs of the leaves in the sunlight, songs of the fern-brake in shadow,
Songs of the world of the woods and songs of the marsh and the mere,
Are they not English woods, dear English marshland and meadow? 
Have not your poets loved you?  England, are you not dear?

Shoulders of upland brown laid dark to the sunset’s bosom,
Living amber of wheat, and copper of new-ploughed loam,
Downs where the white sheep wander, little gardens in blossom,
Roads that wind through the twilight up to the lights of home. 
Lanes that are white with hawthorn, dykes where the sedges shiver,
Hollows where caged winds slumber, moorlands where winds wake free,
Sowing and reaping and gleaning, spring and torrent and river,
Are they not more, by worlds, than the whole of the world can be?

Is there a corner of land, a furze-fringed rag of a by-way,
Coign of your foam-white cliffs or swirl of your grass-green waves,
Leaf of your peaceful copse, or dust of your strenuous highway,
But in our hearts is sacred, dear as our cradles, our graves? 
Is not each bough in your orchards, each cloud in the skies above you,
Is not each byre or homestead, furrow or farm or fold,
Dear as the last dear drops of the blood in the hearts that love you,
Filling those hearts till the love is more than the heart can hold? 
Therefore the song breaks forth from the depths of the hidden fountain
Singing your least frail flower, your raiment of seas and skies,
Singing your pasture and cornfield, fen and valley and mountain,
England, desire of my heart, England, delight of mine eyes! 
Take my song too, my country:  many a son and debtor
Pays you in praise and homage out of your gifts’ full store;
Life of my life, my England, many will praise you better,
None, by the God that made you, ever can love you more!

Summer song.

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The Rainbow and the Rose from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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