Lord Ormont and His Aminta — Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 79 pages of information about Lord Ormont and His Aminta — Volume 2.

Title:  Lord Ormont and his Aminta, v2

Author:  George Meredith

Edition:  10

Language:  English

Character set encoding:  ASCII

Release Date:  September, 2003 [Etext #4478] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on February 25, 2002]

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BOOK 2.

VI.  In A mood of languor
VII.  Exhibits effects of A PRATTLER’S doses
VIII.  Mrs. Lawrence Finchley
IX.  A flash of the bruised warrior
X. A short passage in the game played by two
XI.  The secretary taken as an antidote

CHAPTER VI.

IN A MOOD OF LANGUOR

Up in Aminta’s amber dressing-room; Mrs. Nargett Pagnell alluded sadly to the long month of separation, and begged her niece to let her have in plain words an exact statement of the present situation; adding, “Items will do.”  Thereupon she slipped into prattle and held the field.

She was the known, worthy, good, intolerable woman whom the burgess turns out for his world in regiments, that do and look and all but step alike; and they mean well, and have conventional worships and material aspirations, and very peculiar occult refinements, with a blind head and a haphazard gleam of acuteness, impressive to acquaintances, convincing themselves that they impersonate sagacity.  She had said this, done that; and it was, by proof, Providence consenting, the right thing.  A niece, written

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Lord Ormont and His Aminta — Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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