Maggie, a Girl of the Streets eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 77 pages of information about Maggie, a Girl of the Streets.

“Eh?” said his mother.

“Maggie’s gone teh deh devil!  Are yehs deaf?” roared Jimmie, impatiently.

“Deh hell she has,” murmured the mother, astounded.

Jimmie grunted, and then began to stare out at the window.  His mother sat down in a chair, but a moment later sprang erect and delivered a maddened whirl of oaths.  Her son turned to look at her as she reeled and swayed in the middle of the room, her fierce face convulsed with passion, her blotched arms raised high in imprecation.

“May Gawd curse her forever,” she shrieked.  “May she eat nothin’ but stones and deh dirt in deh street.  May she sleep in deh gutter an’ never see deh sun shine agin.  Deh damn—­”

“Here, now,” said her son.  “Take a drop on yourself.”

The mother raised lamenting eyes to the ceiling.

“She’s deh devil’s own chil’, Jimmie,” she whispered.  “Ah, who would t’ink such a bad girl could grow up in our fambly, Jimmie, me son.  Many deh hour I’ve spent in talk wid dat girl an’ tol’ her if she ever went on deh streets I’d see her damned.  An’ after all her bringin’ up an’ what I tol’ her and talked wid her, she goes teh deh bad, like a duck teh water.”

The tears rolled down her furrowed face.  Her hands trembled.

“An’ den when dat Sadie MacMallister next door to us was sent teh deh devil by dat feller what worked in deh soap-factory, didn’t I tell our Mag dat if she—­”

“Ah, dat’s annuder story,” interrupted the brother.  “Of course, dat Sadie was nice an’ all dat—­but—­see—­it ain’t dessame as if—­well, Maggie was diff’ent—­see—­she was diff’ent.”

He was trying to formulate a theory that he had always unconsciously held, that all sisters, excepting his own, could advisedly be ruined.

He suddenly broke out again.  “I’ll go t’ump hell outa deh mug what did her deh harm.  I’ll kill ’im!  He t’inks he kin scrap, but when he gits me a-chasin’ ‘im he’ll fin’ out where he’s wrong, deh damned duffer.  I’ll wipe up deh street wid ’im.”

In a fury he plunged out of the doorway.  As he vanished the mother raised her head and lifted both hands, entreating.

“May Gawd curse her forever,” she cried.

In the darkness of the hallway Jimmie discerned a knot of women talking volubly.  When he strode by they paid no attention to him.

“She allus was a bold thing,” he heard one of them cry in an eager voice.  “Dere wasn’t a feller come teh deh house but she’d try teh mash ’im.  My Annie says deh shameless t’ing tried teh ketch her feller, her own feller, what we useter know his fader.”

“I could a’ tol’ yehs dis two years ago,” said a woman, in a key of triumph.  “Yessir, it was over two years ago dat I says teh my ol’ man, I says, ‘Dat Johnson girl ain’t straight,’ I says.  ‘Oh, hell,’ he says.  ‘Oh, hell.’  ‘Dat’s all right,’ I says, ‘but I know what I knows,’ I says, ‘an’ it ’ill come out later.  You wait an’ see,’ I says, ‘you see.’”

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Maggie, a Girl of the Streets from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.