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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 77 pages of information about Maggie, a Girl of the Streets.

Chapter VII

An orchestra of yellow silk women and bald-headed men on an elevated stage near the centre of a great green-hued hall, played a popular waltz.  The place was crowded with people grouped about little tables.  A battalion of waiters slid among the throng, carrying trays of beer glasses and making change from the inexhaustible vaults of their trousers pockets.  Little boys, in the costumes of French chefs, paraded up and down the irregular aisles vending fancy cakes.  There was a low rumble of conversation and a subdued clinking of glasses.  Clouds of tobacco smoke rolled and wavered high in air about the dull gilt of the chandeliers.

The vast crowd had an air throughout of having just quitted labor.  Men with calloused hands and attired in garments that showed the wear of an endless trudge for a living, smoked their pipes contentedly and spent five, ten, or perhaps fifteen cents for beer.  There was a mere sprinkling of kid-gloved men who smoked cigars purchased elsewhere.  The great body of the crowd was composed of people who showed that all day they strove with their hands.  Quiet Germans, with maybe their wives and two or three children, sat listening to the music, with the expressions of happy cows.  An occasional party of sailors from a war-ship, their faces pictures of sturdy health, spent the earlier hours of the evening at the small round tables.  Very infrequent tipsy men, swollen with the value of their opinions, engaged their companions in earnest and confidential conversation.  In the balcony, and here and there below, shone the impassive faces of women.  The nationalities of the Bowery beamed upon the stage from all directions.

Pete aggressively walked up a side aisle and took seats with Maggie at a table beneath the balcony.

“Two beehs!”

Leaning back he regarded with eyes of superiority the scene before them.  This attitude affected Maggie strongly.  A man who could regard such a sight with indifference must be accustomed to very great things.

It was obvious that Pete had been to this place many times before, and was very familiar with it.  A knowledge of this fact made Maggie feel little and new.

He was extremely gracious and attentive.  He displayed the consideration of a cultured gentleman who knew what was due.

“Say, what deh hell?  Bring deh lady a big glass!  What deh hell use is dat pony?”

“Don’t be fresh, now,” said the waiter, with some warmth, as he departed.

“Ah, git off deh eart’,” said Pete, after the other’s retreating form.

Maggie perceived that Pete brought forth all his elegance and all his knowledge of high-class customs for her benefit.  Her heart warmed as she reflected upon his condescension.

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