The Adventures Harry Richmond — Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 638 pages of information about The Adventures Harry Richmond Complete.

The door slammed violently on such further speech as he had in him to utter.  He seemed at first astonished; but finding the terrified boy about to sob, he drew a pretty box from one of his pockets and thrust a delicious sweetmeat between the whimpering lips.  Then, after some moments of irresolution, during which he struck his chest soundingly and gazed down, talked alternately to himself and the boy, and cast his eyes along the windows of the house, he at last dropped on one knee and swaddled the boy in the folds of the shawl.  Raising him in a business-like way, he settled him on an arm and stepped briskly across gravel-walk and lawn, like a horse to whose neck a smart touch of the whip has been applied.

The soft mild night had a moon behind it somewhere; and here and there a light-blue space of sky showed small rayless stars; the breeze smelt fresh of roots and heath.  It was more a May-night than one of February.  So strange an aspect had all these quiet hill-lines and larch and fir-tree tops in the half-dark stillness, that the boy’s terrors were overlaid and almost subdued by his wonderment; he had never before been out in the night, and he must have feared to cry in it, for his sobs were not loud.  On a rise of the park-road where a fir-plantation began, he heard his name called faintly from the house by a woman’s voice that he knew to be his aunt Dorothy’s.  It came after him only once:  ’Harry Richmond’; but he was soon out of hearing, beyond the park, among the hollows that run dipping for miles beside the great highroad toward London.  Sometimes his father whistled to him, or held him high and nodded a salutation to him, as though they had just discovered one another; and his perpetual accessibility to the influences of spicy sugarplums, notwithstanding his grief, caused his father to prognosticate hopefully of his future wisdom.  So, when obedient to command he had given his father a kiss, the boy fell asleep on his shoulder, ceasing to know that he was a wandering infant:  and, if I remember rightly, he dreamed he was in a ship of cinnamon-wood upon a sea that rolled mighty, but smooth immense broad waves, and tore thing from thing without a sound or a hurt.

CHAPTER II

AN ADVENTURE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT

That night stands up without any clear traces about it or near it, like the brazen castle of romance round which the sea-tide flows.  My father must have borne me miles along the road; he must have procured food for me; I have an idea of feeling a damp forehead and drinking new milk, and by-and-by hearing a roar of voices or vehicles, and seeing a dog that went alone through crowded streets without a master, doing as he pleased, and stopping every other dog he met.  He took his turning, and my father and I took ours.  We were in a house that, to my senses, had the smell of dark corners, in a street where all the house-doors were painted black, and shut with a bang.  Italian organ-men and milk-men paraded the street regularly, and made it sound hollow to their music.  Milk, and no cows anywhere; numbers of people, and no acquaintances among them; my thoughts were occupied by the singularity of such things.

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The Adventures Harry Richmond — Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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