The Adventures Harry Richmond — Volume 3 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 79 pages of information about The Adventures Harry Richmond Volume 3.

WE ARE ACCOSTED BY A BEAUTIFUL LITTLE LADY IN THE FOREST

Bowls of hot coffee and milk, with white rolls of bread to dip in them, refreshed us at a forest inn.  For some minutes after the meal Temple and I talked like interchangeing puffs of steam, but soon subsided to our staring fit.  The pipes were lit again.  What we heard sounded like a language of the rocks and caves, and roots plucked up, a language of gluttons feasting; the word ja was like a door always on the hinge in every mouth.  Dumpy children, bulky men, compressed old women with baked faces, and comical squat dogs, kept the villages partly alive.  We observed one young urchin sitting on a stone opposite a dog, and he and the dog took alternate bites off a platter-shaped cake, big enough to require both his hands to hold it.  Whether the dog ever snapped more than his share was matter of speculation to us.  It was an education for him in good manners, and when we were sitting at dinner we wished our companions had enjoyed it.  They fed with their heads in their plates, splashed and clattered jaws, without paying us any hospitable attention whatever, so that we had the dish of Lazarus.  They were perfectly kind, notwithstanding, and allowed a portion of my great map of Germany to lie spread over their knees in the diligence, whilst Temple and I pored along the lines of the rivers.  One would thrust his square-nailed finger to the name of a city and pronounce it; one gave us lessons in the expression of the vowels, with the softening of three of them, which seemed like a regulation drill movement for taking an egg into the mouth, and showing repentance of the act.  ‘Sarkeld,’ we exclaimed mutually, and they made a galloping motion of their hands, pointing beyond the hills.  Sarkeld was to the right, Sarkeld to the left, as the road wound on.  Sarkeld was straight in front of us when the conductor, according to directions he had received, requested us to alight and push through this endless fir-forest up a hilly branch road, and away his hand galloped beyond it, coming to a deep place, and then to grapes, then to a tip-toe station, and under it lay Sarkeld.  The pantomime was not bad.  We waved our hand to the diligence, and set out cheerfully, with our bags at our backs, entering a gorge in the fir-covered hills before sunset, after starting the proposition—­Does the sun himself look foreign in a foreign country?

‘Yes, he does,’ said Temple; and so I thought, but denied it, for by the sun’s favour I hoped to see my father that night, and hail Apollo joyfully in the morning; a hope that grew with exercise of my limbs.  Beautiful cascades of dark bright water leaped down the gorge; we chased an invisible animal.  Suddenly one of us exclaimed, ’We ’re in a German forest’; and we remembered grim tales of these forests, their awful castles, barons, knights, ladies, long-bearded dwarfs, gnomes and thin people.  I commenced a legend off-hand.

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The Adventures Harry Richmond — Volume 3 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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