Vittoria — Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 71 pages of information about Vittoria Volume 1.

After a consultation with Agostino, Ugo Corte and Marco and Giulio bade their adieux to her.  The task of keeping Luigi from their clutches was difficult; but Agostino helped her in that also.  To assure them, after his fashion, of the harmlessness of Luigi, he seconded him in a contest of wit against Beppo, and the little fellow, now that he had shaken off his fears, displayed a quickness of retort and a liveliness “unknown to professional spies and impossible to the race,” said Agostino; “so absolutely is the mind of man blunted by Austrian gold.  We know that for a fact.  Beppo is no match for him.  Beppo is sententious; ponderously illustrative; he can’t turn; he is long-winded; he, I am afraid, my Carlo, studies the journals.  He has got your journalistic style, wherein words of six syllables form the relief to words of eight, and hardly one dares to stand by itself.  They are like huge boulders across a brook.  The meaning, do you, see, would run of itself, but you give us these impedimenting big stones to help us over it, while we profess to understand you by implication.  For my part, I own, that to me, your parliamentary, illegitimate academic, modern crocodile phraseology, which is formidable in the jaws, impenetrable on the back, can’t circumvent a corner, and is enabled to enter a common understanding solely by having a special highway prepared for it,—­in short, the writing in your journals is too much for me.  Beppo here is an example that the style is useless for controversy.  This Luigi baffles him at every step.”

“Some,” rejoined Carlo, “say that Beppo has had the virtue to make you his study.”

Agostino threw himself on his back and closed his eyes.  “That, then, is more than you have done, signor Tuquoque.  Look on the Bernina yonder, and fancy you behold a rout of phantom Goths; a sleepy rout, new risen, with the blood of old battles on their shroud-shirts, and a North-east wind blowing them upon our fat land.  Or take a turn at the other side toward Orta, and look out for another invasion, by no means so picturesque, but preferable.  Tourists!  Do you hear them?”

Carlo Ammiani had descried the advanced troop of a procession of gravely-heated climbers ladies upon donkeys, and pedestrian guards stalking beside them, with courier, and lacqueys, and baskets of provisions, all bearing the stamp of pilgrims from the great Western Island.

CHAPTER VI

A mountain ascended by these children of the forcible Isle, is a mountain to be captured, and colonized, and absolutely occupied for a term; so that Vittoria soon found herself and her small body of adherents observed, and even exclaimed against, as a sort of intruding aborigines, whose presence entirely dispelled the sense of romantic dominion which a mighty eminence should give, and which Britons expect when they have expended a portion of their energies.  The exclamations

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Vittoria — Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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