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Sandra Belloni — Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 546 pages of information about Sandra Belloni Complete.

Jumping briskly from a restless bed, his first act was to address his features to the looking-glass:  and he saw surely the most glorious sight for a hero of the knightly age that could possibly have been offered.  The battle of the previous night was written there in one eloquent big lump, which would have passed him current as hero from end to end of the land in the great days of old.  These are the tea-table days.  His preference was for the visage of Wilfrid Pole, which he saw not.  At the aspect of the fearful mask, this young man stared, and then cursed; and then, by an odd transition, he was reminded, as by the force of a sudden gust, that Emilia’s hair was redolent of pipe-smoke.

His remark was, “I can’t be seen in this state.”  His thought (a dim reminiscence of poetical readings):  “Ambrosial locks indeed!” A sad irony, which told that much gold-leaf had peeled away from her image in his heart.

Wilfrid was a gallant fellow, with good stuff in him.  But, he was young.  Ponder on that pregnant word, for you are about to see him grow.  He was less a coxcomb than shamefaced and sentimental; and one may have these qualities, and be a coxcomb to boot, and yet be a gallant fellow.  One may also be a gallant fellow, and harsh, exacting, double-dealing, and I know not what besides, in youth.  The question asked by nature is, “Has he the heart to take and keep an impression?” For, if he has, circumstances will force him on and carve the figure of a brave man out of that mass of contradictions.  In return for such benefits, he pays forfeit commonly of the dearest of the things prized by him in this terrestrial life.  Whereat, albeit created man by her, he reproaches nature, and the sculptor, circumstance; forgetting that to make him man is their sole duty, and that what betrayed him was the difficulty thrown in their way by his quondam self—­the pleasant boonfellow!

He forgets, in fact, that he was formerly led by his nose, and sacrificed his deeper feeling to a low disgust.

When the youth is called upon to look up, he can adore devoutly and ardently; but when it is his chance to look down on a fair head, he is, if not worse, a sentimental despot.

Wilfrid was young, and under the dominion of his senses; which can be, if the sentimentalists will believe me, as tyrannous and misleading when super-refined as when ultra-bestial.  He made a good stout effort to resist the pipe-smoke.  Emilia’s voice, her growing beauty, her simplicity, her peculiar charms of feature, were all conjured up to combat the dismal images suggested by that fatal, dragging-down smell.  It was vain.  Horrible pipe-smoke pervaded the memory of her.  It seemed to his offended dainty fancy that he could never dissociate her from smoking-booths and abominably bad tobacco; and, let us add (for this was part of the secret), that it never could dwell on her without the companionship of a hideous disfigured countenance, claiming to be Wilfrid Pole.  He

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