In Wicklow and West Kerry eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 93 pages of information about In Wicklow and West Kerry.

Before he had finished a tinker arrived, too drunk to stand or walk, but leading a tall horse with his left hand, and inviting anyone who would deny that he was the best horseman in Wicklow to fight with him on the spot.  Soon afterwards I started on my way home, driving most of the way with a farmer from the same neighbourhood.

A Landlord’s Garden in County Wicklow

A stone’s throw from an old house where I spent several summers in County Wicklow, there was a garden that had been left to itself for fifteen or twenty years.  Just inside the gate, as one entered, two paths led up through a couple of strawberry beds, half choked with leaves, where a few white and narrow strawberries were still hidden away.  Further on was nearly half an acre of tall raspberry canes and thistles five feet high, growing together in a dense mass, where one could still pick raspberries enough to last a household for the season.  Then, in a waste of hemlock, there were some half-dozen apple trees covered with lichen and moss, and against the northern walls a few dying plum trees hanging from their nails.  Beyond them there was a dead pear tree, and just inside the gate, as one came back to it, a large fuchsia filled with empty nests.  A few lines of box here and there showed where the flower-beds had been laid out, and when anyone who had the knowledge looked carefully among them many remnants could be found of beautiful and rare plants.

All round this garden there was a wall seven or eight feet high, in which one could see three or four tracks with well-worn holes—­like the paths down a cliff in Kerry—­where boys and tramps came over to steal and take away any apples or other fruits that were in season.  Above the wall on the three windy sides there were rows of finely-grown lime trees, the place of meeting in the summer for ten thousand bees.  Under the east wall there was the roof of a green-house, where one could sit, when it was wet or dry, and watch the birds and butterflies, many of which were not common.  The seasons were always late in this place—­it was high above the sea—­and redpoles often used to nest not far off late in the summer; siskins did the same once or twice, and greenfinches, till the beginning of August, used to cackle endlessly in the lime trees.

Everyone is used in Ireland to the tragedy that is bound up with the lives of farmers and fishing people; but in this garden one seemed to feel the tragedy of the landlord class also, and of the innumerable old families that are quickly dwindling away.  These owners of the land are not much pitied at the present day, or much deserving of pity; and yet one cannot quite forget that they are the descendants of what was at one time, in the eighteenth century, a high-spirited and highly-cultivated aristocracy.  The broken greenhouses and mouse-eaten libraries, that were designed and collected by men who voted with Grattan, are perhaps as mournful in the end as

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In Wicklow and West Kerry from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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