Complete Plays of John Galsworthy eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 853 pages of information about Complete Plays of John Galsworthy.

Felsman.  The cursed music of the Town!  Is it back to him thou wilt go? [Groping for sight of the hated figure] I cannot see.

Seelchen.  Fear not!  I go ever onward.

Felsman.  Do not leave me to the wind in the rocks!  Without thee love is dead, and I must die.

Seelchen.  Poor heart!  I am gone.

Felsman. [Crouching against the rock] It is cold.

     At the blowing of the Shepherd’s pipe, the cow horn stretches
     forth his hand to her.  The mandolin twangs out, and the wine
     horn holds out his hand.  She stands unmoving.

Seelchen.  Companions.  I must go.  In a moment it will be dawn.

     In Silence the cow horn and the wine horn, cover their faces. 
     The false dawn dies.  It falls quite dark.

SCENE V

Then a faint glow stealing up, lights the snowy head of the great horn, and streams forth on Seelchen.  To either aide of that path of light, like shadows.  The cow horn and the wine horn stand with cloaked heads.

Seelchen.  Great One!  I come!

     The Peak of the great horn speaks in a far-away voice, growing,
     with the light, clearer and stronger.

          Wandering flame, thou restless fever
          Burning all things, regretting none;
          The winds of fate are stilled for ever—­
          Thy little generous life is done. 
          And all its wistful wonderings cease! 
          Thou traveller to the tideless sea,
          Where light and dark, and change and peace,
          Are One—­Come, little soul, to mystery!

     Seelchen falling on her knees, bows her head to the ground.  The
     glow slowly fades till the scene is black.

SCENE VI

Then as the blackness lifts, in the dim light of the false dawn filtering through the window of the mountain hut.  Lamond and Felsman are seen standing beside Seelchen looking down at her asleep on the window seat.

Felsman. [Putting out his hand to wake her] In a moment it will be dawn.

     She stirs, and her lips move, murmuring.

Lamond.  Let her sleep.  She’s dreaming.

     Felsman raises a lantern, till its light falls on her face. 
     Then the two men move stealthily towards the door, and, as she
     speaks, pass out.

Seelchen. [Rising to her knees, and stretching out her hands with ecstasy] Great One.  I come! [Waking, she looks around, and struggles to her feet] My little dream!

     Through the open door, the first flush of dawn shows in the sky. 
     There is a sound of goat-bells passing.

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Project Gutenberg
Complete Plays of John Galsworthy from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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