Abbeychurch eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 214 pages of information about Abbeychurch.

‘Helen is very unlike the others in everything,’ said Anne.

‘Helen will be the handsomest as far as regularity of features goes,’ said Lady Merton.

‘Do you think so?’ said Anne.

‘Certainly,’ said Lady Merton; ’her features are less prominent, and her colour has not that fixed hectic look that both the others have, especially Lizzie.’

‘But she wants brightness and animation,’ said Anne, ’and she so often looks dismal and fretful, that I cannot fancy admiring her.’

‘There has never been much sympathy between you and Helen,’ said Lady Merton, smiling.

‘No,’ said Anne, ’I never felt as if I knew or liked her.  I believe Rupert and I were very unkind to her in our younger days; but, oh! she was the most tiresome whining child I ever knew.’

‘I believe that, though she was too young to know it,’ said Lady Merton, ’poor little Helen suffered more from your aunt’s death than either of her sisters.’

‘How so, Mamma?’ said Anne, looking rather alarmed.

‘She was a very delicate baby, requiring a great deal of care,’ said Lady Merton; ’indeed, we have always thought that your aunt laid the foundation of her illness, by sitting up with her while she was cutting her large teeth, and during your aunt’s illness, it was painful to see how the poor child missed her.  And after her mother died, though Helen had grown strong and healthy, old Margaret still made her the pet; and uncertain nursery treatment, without her mother’s firm kindness, was not the best cure for such a temper as hers.’

‘Yes,’ said Anne, ’I remember she was always called Baby, and allowed to have her own way, till she was six years old, when Horace was born.  How very ill-natured I must have been to her, and how cruel it really was of me.  But I wonder my uncle did not prevent Margaret from spoiling her.’

’My dear, a man with a parish of fifteen hundred inhabitants, cannot watch his own nursery very minutely,’ said Lady Merton; ’he taught Elizabeth admirably, and that was all that could be expected of him.  Besides, with all his perfections, managing little girls is not what he is best fitted for.’

Anne laughed.  ’No, he is too grave and cold; I am rather afraid of him still, I do not think he has any toleration for nonsense; but of course he must be different with his own children.  And how do you think Mrs. Woodbourne trained Helen?’

‘I can hardly tell,’ said Lady Merton; ’I used to admire her patience and sweetness of temper, when Helen’s fretfulness was most wearisome; at the same time that I thought it might have been better for the child to speak sharply to her, and punish her if she did not leave off whining directly.  I believe I should have done so, though I do not know that it would have been the best way, or in accordance with what you call my motto.’

‘Well,’ said Anne, ’if Dykelands has done such wonders for Helen, as they say, I hope I shall make friends with her, if she will let me, which I do not think I deserve after my ill-usage of her.  Last time I saw her, it was but for two days, and she was so odd, and grave, and shy, that I could not get on with her, besides that I wanted to make the most of my time with Lizzie.’

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Abbeychurch from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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