Heroes Every Child Should Know eBook

Hamilton Wright Mabie
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 308 pages of information about Heroes Every Child Should Know.

So the two knights buried him in that far city, themselves mourning and all the people with them.  And immediately after, Sir Percivale put off his arms and took the habit of a monk, living a devout and holy life until, a year and two months later, he also died and was buried near Sir Galahad.  Then Sir Bors armed him, and bidding farewell to the city, sailed away until, after many weeks, he came again to the land of Britain.  There he took horse, and stayed not till he had come to Camelot.  Great was the rejoicing of Arthur and all his knights when Sir Bors was once more among them.  When he had told all the adventures which had befallen him and the good knights, his companions, all who heard were filled with amaze.  But the King he caused the wisest clerks in the land to write in great books of the Holy Grail, that the fame of it should endure unto all time.

CHAPTER VII

SIR GALAHAD

BY ALFRED LORD TENNYSON

My good blade carves the casques of men,
 My tough lance thrusteth sure,

My strength is as the strength of ten,
 Because my heart is pure.

The shattering trumpet shrilleth high,
 The hard brands shiver on the steel,

The splinter’d spear-shafts crack and fly,
 The horse and rider reel: 

They reel, they roll in clanging lists,
 And when the tide of combat stands,

Perfume and flowers fall in showers
 That lightly rain from ladies’ hands.

 How sweet are looks that ladies bend
 On whom their favours fall!

For them I battle till the end,
 To save from shame and thrall: 

But all my heart is drawn above,
 My knees are bow’d in crypt and shrine: 

I never felt the kiss of love,
 Nor maiden’s hand in mine.

More bounteous aspects on me beam,
 Me mightier transports move and thrill;

So keep I fair thro’ faith and prayer
 A virgin heart in work and will.

 When down the stormy crescent goes,
 A light before me swims,

Between dark stems the forest glows,
 I hear a noise of hymns: 

Then by some secret shrine I ride;
 I hear a voice, but none are there;

The stalls are void, the doors are wide,
 The tapers burning fair.

Fair gleams the snowy altar-cloth,
 The silver vessels sparkle clean,

The shrill bell rings, the censer swings,
 And solemn chaunts resound between.

 Sometimes on lonely mountain-meres
 I find a magic bark;

I leap on board:  no helmsman steers
 I float till all is dark.

A gentle sound, an awful light! 
 Three angels bear the Holy Grail: 

With folded feet, in stoles of white,
 On sleeping wings they sail.

Ah, blessed vision! blood of God! 
 My spirit beats her mortal bars,

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Project Gutenberg
Heroes Every Child Should Know from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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