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Hamilton Wright Mabie
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 308 pages of information about Heroes Every Child Should Know.

ROBERT E. LEE

A BOY’S IMPRESSIONS

The first vivid recollection I have of my father is his arrival in Arlington, after his return from the Mexican War.  I can remember some events of which he seemed a part, when we lived at Fort Hamilton, New York, about 1846, but they are more like dreams, very indistinct and disconnected—­naturally so, for I was at that time about three years old.  But the day of his return to Arlington, after an absence of more than two years, I have always remembered.  I had a frock or blouse of some light wash material, probably cotton, a blue ground dotted over with white diamond figures.  Of this I was very proud, and wanted to wear it on this important occasion.  Eliza, my “mammy,” objecting, we had a contest and I won.  Clothed in this, my very best, and with my hair freshly curled in long golden ringlets, I went down into the large hall where the whole household was assembled, eagerly greeting my father, who had just arrived on horseback from Washington, having missed in some way the carriage which had been sent for him.

There was visiting us at this time Mrs. Lippitt, a friend of my mother’s, with her little boy, Armistead, about my age and size, also with long curls.  Whether he wore as handsome a suit as mine I cannot remember, but he and I were left together in the background, feeling rather frightened and awed.  After a moment’s greeting to those surrounding him, my father pushed through the crowd, exclaiming: 

“Where is my little boy?”

He then took up in his arms and kissed—­not me his own child, in his best frock with clean face and well-arranged curls—­but my little playmate, Armistead.  I remember nothing more of any circumstances connected with that time, save that I was shocked and humiliated.  I have no doubt that he was at once informed of his mistake and made ample amends to me.

A letter from my father to his brother, Captain S. S. Lee, United States Navy, dated “Arlington, June 30, 1848,” tells of his coming home: 

“Here I am once again, my dear Smith, perfectly surrounded by Mary and her precious children, who seem to devote themselves to staring at the furrows in my face and the white hairs in my head.  It is not surprising that I am hardly recognisable to some of the young eyes around me and perfectly unknown to the youngest.  But some of the older ones gaze with astonishment and wonder at me, and seem at a loss to reconcile what they see and what was pictured in their imaginations.  I find them, too, much grown, and all well, and I have much cause for thankfulness, and gratitude to that good God who has once more united us.”

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