The Complete Essays of John Galsworthy eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 173 pages of information about The Complete Essays of John Galsworthy.

THE PROCESSION

In one of those corners of our land canopied by the fumes of blind industry, there was, on that day, a lull in darkness.  A fresh wind had split the customary heaven, or roof of hell; was sweeping long drifts of creamy clouds across a blue still pallid with reek.  The sun even shone—­a sun whose face seemed white and wondering.  And under that rare sun all the little town, among its slag heaps and few tall chimneys, had an air of living faster.  In those continuous courts and alleys, where the women worked, smoke from each little forge rose and dispersed into the wind with strange alacrity; amongst the women, too, there was that same eagerness, for the sunshine had crept in and was making pale all those dark-raftered, sooted ceilings which covered them in, together with their immortal comrades, the small open furnaces.  About their work they had been busy since seven o’clock; their feet pressing the leather lungs which fanned the conical heaps of glowing fuel, their hands poking into the glow a thin iron rod till the end could be curved into a fiery hook; snapping it with a mallet; threading it with tongs on to the chain; hammering, closing the link; and; without a second’s pause, thrusting the iron rod again into the glow.  And while they worked they chattered, laughed sometimes, now and then sighed.  They seemed of all ages and all types; from her who looked like a peasant of Provence, broad, brown, and strong, to the weariest white consumptive wisp; from old women of seventy, with straggling grey hair, to fifteen-year-old girls.  In the cottage forges there would be but one worker, or two at most; in the shop forges four, or even five, little glowing heaps; four or five of the grimy, pale lung-bellows; and never a moment without a fiery hook about to take its place on the growing chains, never a second when the thin smoke of the forges, and of those lives consuming slowly in front of them, did not escape from out of the dingy, whitewashed spaces past the dark rafters, away to freedom.

But there had been in the air that morning something more than the white sunlight.  There had been anticipation.  And at two o’clock began fulfilment.  The forges were stilled, and from court and alley forth came the women.  In their ragged working clothes, in their best clothes—­so little different; in bonnets, in hats, bareheaded; with babies born and unborn, they swarmed into the high street and formed across it behind the band.  A strange, magpie, jay-like flock; black, white, patched with brown and green and blue, shifting, chattering, laughing, seeming unconscious of any purpose.  A thousand and more of them, with faces twisted and scored by those myriad deformings which a desperate town-toiling and little food fasten on human visages; yet with hardly a single evil or brutal face.  Seemingly it was not easy to be evil or brutal on a wage that scarcely bound soul and body.  A thousand and more of the poorest-paid and hardest-worked human beings in the world.

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The Complete Essays of John Galsworthy from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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