Kidnapped eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 294 pages of information about Kidnapped.

“Are ye still wearied?” he asked again.

“No,” said I, still with my face in the bracken; “no, I am not wearied now, and I can speak.  You and me must twine,"* I said.  “I liked you very well, Alan, but your ways are not mine, and they’re not God’s:  and the short and the long of it is just that we must twine.”

     * Part.

“I will hardly twine from ye, David, without some kind of reason for the same,” said Alan, mighty gravely.  “If ye ken anything against my reputation, it’s the least thing that ye should do, for old acquaintance’ sake, to let me hear the name of it; and if ye have only taken a distaste to my society, it will be proper for me to judge if I’m insulted.”

“Alan,” said I, “what is the sense of this?  Ye ken very well yon Campbell-man lies in his blood upon the road.”

He was silent for a little; then says he, “Did ever ye hear tell of the story of the Man and the Good People?”—­by which he meant the fairies.

“No,” said I, “nor do I want to hear it.”

“With your permission, Mr. Balfour, I will tell it you, whatever,” says Alan.  “The man, ye should ken, was cast upon a rock in the sea, where it appears the Good People were in use to come and rest as they went through to Ireland.  The name of this rock is called the Skerryvore, and it’s not far from where we suffered ship-wreck.  Well, it seems the man cried so sore, if he could just see his little bairn before he died! that at last the king of the Good People took peety upon him, and sent one flying that brought back the bairn in a poke* and laid it down beside the man where he lay sleeping.  So when the man woke, there was a poke beside him and something into the inside of it that moved.  Well, it seems he was one of these gentry that think aye the worst of things; and for greater security, he stuck his dirk throughout that poke before he opened it, and there was his bairn dead.  I am thinking to myself, Mr. Balfour, that you and the man are very much alike.”

     * Bag.

“Do you mean you had no hand in it?” cried I, sitting up.

“I will tell you first of all, Mr. Balfour of Shaws, as one friend to another,” said Alan, “that if I were going to kill a gentleman, it would not be in my own country, to bring trouble on my clan; and I would not go wanting sword and gun, and with a long fishing-rod upon my back.”

“Well,” said I, “that’s true!”

“And now,” continued Alan, taking out his dirk and laying his hand upon it in a certain manner, “I swear upon the Holy Iron I had neither art nor part, act nor thought in it.”

“I thank God for that!” cried I, and offered him my hand.

He did not appear to see it.

“And here is a great deal of work about a Campbell!” said he.  “They are not so scarce, that I ken!”

“At least,” said I, “you cannot justly blame me, for you know very well what you told me in the brig.  But the temptation and the act are different, I thank God again for that.  We may all be tempted; but to take a life in cold blood, Alan!” And I could say no more for the moment.  “And do you know who did it?” I added.  “Do you know that man in the black coat?”

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Kidnapped from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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