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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 604 pages of information about Diary of Samuel Pepys Complete 1667 N.S..

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     Anthem anything but instrumentall musique with the voice
     Chief Court of judicature (House of Lords)
     Confidence, and vanity, and disparages everything
     Had the umbles of it for dinner
     I am not a man able to go through trouble, as other men
     Liberty of speech in the House
     Nor offer anything, but just what is drawn out of a man
     Through my wife’s illness had a bad night of it, and she a worse
     What I said would not hold water

THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS M.A.  F.R.S.

CLERK OF THE ACTS AND SECRETARY TO THE ADMIRALTY

Transcribed from the shorthand manuscript in the PEPYSIAN library
Magdalene college Cambridge by the Rev.  MYNORS Bright M.A.  Late fellow
and President of the college

(Unabridged)

WITH LORD BRAYBROOKE’S NOTES

Editedwith additions by

Henry B. Wheatley F.S.A.

Diary of Samuel Pepys. 
December
1667

December 1st (Lord’s day).  Up, and after entering my journal for 2 or 3 days, I to church, where Mr. Mills, a dull sermon:  and in our pew there sat a great lady, which I afterwards understood to be my Lady Carlisle, that made her husband a cuckold in Scotland, a very fine woman indeed in person.  After sermon home, where W. Hewer dined with us, and after dinner he and I all the afternoon to read over our office letters to see what matters can be got for our advantage or disadvantage therein.  In the evening comes Mr. Pelling and the two men that were with him formerly, the little man that sings so good a base (Wallington) and another that understands well, one Pigott, and Betty Turner come and sat and supped with us, and we spent the evening mighty well in good musique, to my great content to see myself in condition to have these and entertain them for my own pleasure only.  So they gone, we to bed.

2nd.  Up, and then abroad to Alderman Backewell’s (who was sick of a cold in bed), and then to the Excise Office, where I find Mr. Ball out of humour in expectation of being put out of his office by the change of the farm of the excise.  There comes Sir H. Cholmly, and he and I to Westminster, and there walked up and down till noon, where all the business is that the Lords’ answer is come down to the Commons, that they are not satisfied in the Commons’ Reasons:  and so the Commons are hot, and like to sit all day upon the business what to do herein, most thinking that they will remonstrate against the Lords.  Thence to Lord Crew’s, and there dined with him; where, after dinner, he took me aside, and bewailed

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