Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1667 N.S. eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 604 pages of information about Diary of Samuel Pepys Complete 1667 N.S..

Diary of Samuel Pepys. 
August
1667

August 1st.  Up, and all the morning at the office.  At noon my wife and I dined at Sir W. Pen’s, only with Mrs. Turner and her husband, on a damned venison pasty, that stunk like a devil.  However, I did not know it till dinner was done.  We had nothing but only this, and a leg of mutton, and a pullet or two.  Mrs. Markham was here, with her great belly.  I was very merry, and after dinner, upon a motion of the women, I was got to go to the play with them-the first I have seen since before the Dutch coming upon our coast, and so to the King’s house, to see “The Custome of the Country.”  The house mighty empty—­more than ever I saw it—­and an ill play.  After the play, we into the house, and spoke with Knipp, who went abroad with us by coach to the Neat Houses in the way to Chelsy; and there, in a box in a tree, we sat and sang, and talked and eat; my wife out of humour, as she always is, when this woman is by.  So, after it was dark, we home.  Set Knepp down at home, who told us the story how Nell is gone from the King’s house, and is kept by my Lord Buckhurst.  Then we home, the gates of the City shut, it being so late:  and at Newgate we find them in trouble, some thieves having this night broke open prison.  So we through, and home; and our coachman was fain to drive hard from two or three fellows, which he said were rogues, that he met at the end of Blow-bladder Street, next Cheapside.  So set Mrs. Turner home, and then we home, and I to the Office a little; and so home and to bed, my wife in an ill humour still.

2nd.  Up, but before I rose my wife fell into angry discourse of my kindness yesterday to Mrs. Knipp, and leading her, and sitting in the coach hand in hand, and my arm about her middle, and in some bad words reproached me with it.  I was troubled, but having much business in my head and desirous of peace rose and did not provoke her.  So she up and come to me and added more, and spoke basely of my father, who I perceive did do something in the country, at her last being there, that did not like her, but I would not enquire into anything, but let her talk, and when ready away to the Office I went, where all the morning I was, only Mr. Gawden come to me, and he and I home to my chamber, and there reckoned, and there I received my profits for Tangier of him, and L250 on my victualling score.  He is a most noble-minded man as ever I met with, and seems to own himself much obliged to me, which I will labour to make him; for he is a good man also:  we talked on many good things relating to the King’s service, and, in fine, I had much matter of joy by this morning’s work, receiving above L400 of him, on one account or other; and a promise that, though I lay down my victualling place, yet, as long as he continues victualler, I shall be the better by him.  To the office again, and there evened all our business with Mr. Kinaston about Colonel Norwood’s Bill of Exchange from Tangier, and I am glad of it,

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Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1667 N.S. from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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