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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 604 pages of information about Diary of Samuel Pepys Complete 1667 N.S..

2nd.  Up, and to the office.  This day I hear that Prince Rupert is to be trepanned.  God give good issue to it.  Sir W. Pen looks upon me, and I on him, and speak about business together at the table well enough, but no friendship or intimacy since our late difference about his closet, nor do I desire to have any.  At noon dined well, and my brother and I to write over once more with my own hand my catalogue of books, while he reads to me.  After something of that done, and dined, I to the office, where all the afternoon till night busy.  At night, having done all my office matters, I home, and my brother and I to go on with my catalogue, and so to supper.  Mrs. Turner come to me this night again to condole her condition and the ill usage she receives from my Lord Bruncker, which I could never have expected from him, and shall be a good caution to me while I live.  She gone, I to supper, and then to read a little, and to bed.  This night comes home my new silver snuffe-dish, which I do give myself for my closet, which is all I purpose to bestow in plate of myself, or shall need, many a day, if I can keep what I have.  So to bed.  I am very well pleased this night with reading a poem I brought home with me last night from Westminster Hall, of Dryden’s’ upon the present war; a very good poem.

3rd (Lord’s day).  Up, and with Sir W. Batten and [Sir] W. Pen to White Hall, and there to Sir W. Coventry’s chamber, and there staid till he was ready, talking, and among other things of the Prince’s being trepanned, which was in doing just as we passed through the Stone Gallery, we asking at the door of his lodgings, and were told so.  We are all full of wishes for the good success; though I dare say but few do really concern ourselves for him in our hearts.  Up to the Duke of York, and with him did our business we come about, and among other things resolve upon a meeting at the office to-morrow morning, Sir W. Coventry to be there to determine of all things necessary for the setting of Sir W. Pen to work in his Victualling business.  This did awake in me some thoughts of what might in discourse fall out touching my imployment, and did give me some apprehension of trouble.  Having done here, and after our laying our necessities for money open to the Duke of York, but nothing obtained concerning it, we parted, and I with others into the House, and there hear that the work is done to the Prince in a few minutes without any pain at all to him, he not knowing when it was done.  It was performed by Moulins.  Having cut the outward table, as they call it, they find the inner all corrupted, so as it come out without any force; and their fear is, that the whole inside of his head is corrupted like that, which do yet make them afeard of him; but no ill accident appeared in the doing of the thing, but all with all imaginable success, as Sir Alexander Frazier did tell me himself, I asking him, who is very kind to me.  I to the Chapel a little, but hearing nothing did

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