Ballads eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 53 pages of information about Ballads.

“True was the word I told you: 
Only my son I feared;
For I doubt the sapling courage
That goes without the beard. 
But now in vain is the torture,
Fire shall never avail: 
Here dies in my bosom
The secret of Heather Ale.”

NOTE TO HEATHER ALE

Among the curiosities of human nature, this legend claims a high place.  It is needless to remind the reader that the Picts were never exterminated, and form to this day a large proportion of the folk of Scotland:  occupying the eastern and the central parts, from the Firth of Forth, or perhaps the Lammermoors, upon the south, to the Ord of Caithness on the north.  That the blundering guess of a dull chronicler should have inspired men with imaginary loathing for their own ancestors is already strange:  that it should have begotten this wild legend seems incredible.  Is it possible the chronicler’s error was merely nominal? that what he told, and what the people proved themselves so ready to receive, about the Picts, was true or partly true of some anterior and perhaps Lappish savages, small of stature, black of hue, dwelling underground—­possibly also the distillers of some forgotten spirit?  See Mr. Campbell’s Tales of the West Highlands.

CHRISTMAS AT SEA

The sheets were frozen hard, and they cut the naked hand;
The decks were like a slide, where a seaman scarce could stand;
The wind was a nor’wester, blowing squally off the sea;
And cliffs and spouting breakers were the only things a-lee.

They heard the surf a-roaring before the break of day;
But ’twas only with the peep of light we saw how ill we lay. 
We tumbled every hand on deck instanter, with a shout,
And we gave her the maintops’l, and stood by to go about.

All day we tacked and tacked between the South Head and the North;
All day we hauled the frozen sheets, and got no further forth;
All day as cold as charity, in bitter pain and dread,
For very life and nature we tacked from head to head.

We gave the South a wider berth, for there the tide-race roared;
But every tack we made we brought the North Head close aboard: 
So’s we saw the cliffs and houses, and the breakers running high,
And the coastguard in his garden, with his glass against his eye.

The frost was on the village roofs as white as ocean foam;
The good red fires were burning bright in every ’longshore home;
The windows sparkled clear, and the chimneys volleyed out;
And I vow we sniffed the victuals as the vessel went about.

The bells upon the church were rung with a mighty jovial cheer;
For it’s just that I should tell you how (of all days in the year)
This day of our adversity was blessed Christmas morn,
And the house above the coastguard’s was the house where I was born.

O well I saw the pleasant room, the pleasant faces there,
My mother’s silver spectacles, my father’s silver hair;
And well I saw the firelight, like a flight of homely elves,
Go dancing round the china-plates that stand upon the shelves.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Ballads from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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