Madame Chrysantheme — Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 146 pages of information about Madame Chrysantheme Complete.
quivering with ferocious joys.  It is in this book that Loti has eclipsed Zola.  One of his masterpieces is ‘Mon Freye Yves’ (ocean and Brittany), together with ‘Pecheur d’Islande’ (1886); both translated into German by Elizabeth, Queen of Roumania (Carmen Sylva).  In 1884 was published ’Les trois Dames de la Kasbah,’ relating also to Algiers, and then came ‘Madame Chrysantheme’ (1887), crowned by the Academy.  ’Japoneries d’automne’ (1889), Japanese scenes; then ‘Au Maroc’ (Morocco; 1890).  Partly autobiographical are ‘Le Roman d’un Enfant’ (1890) and ’Le Livre de la Pitie et de la Mort’ (1891).  Then followed ’Fantomes d’Orient (1892), L’Exilee (1893), Le Desert (Syria; 1895), Jerusalem, La Galilee (Palestine; 1895), Pages choisies (1896), Ramuntcho (1897), Reflets sur la Sombre Route’ (1898), and finally ‘Derniers Jours de Pekin’ (1903).  Many exquisite pages are to be found in Loti’s work.  His composition is now and then somewhat disconnected; the impressions are vague, almost illusory, and the mirage is a little obscure, but the intense and abiding charm of Nature remains.  Loti has not again reached the level of Madame Chrysantheme, and English critics at least will have to suspend their judgment for a while.  In any event, he has given to the world many great books, and is shrined with the Forty “Immortals.”

Albert Sorel
de l’Academie Francaise.

DEDICATION

To Madame la Duchesse de Richelieu
Madame la Duchesse,

Permit me to beg your acceptance of this work, as a respectful tribute of my friendship.

I feel some hesitation in offering it, for its theme can not be deemed altogether correct; but I have endeavored to make its expression, at least, in harmony with good taste, and I trust that my endeavors have been successful.

This record is the journal of a summer of my life, in which I have changed nothing, not even the dates, thinking that in our efforts to arrange matters we succeed often only in disarranging them.  Although the most important role may appear to devolve on Madame Chrysantheme, it is very certain that the three principal points of interest are myself, Japan, and the effect produced on me by that country.

Do you recollect a certain photograph—­rather absurd, I must admit—­representing that great fellow Yves, a Japanese girl, and myself, grouped as we were posed by a Nagasaki artist?  You smiled when I assured you that the carefully attired little damsel placed between us had been one of our neighbors.  Kindly receive my book with the same indulgent smile, without seeking therein a meaning either good or bad, in the same spirit in which you would receive some quaint bit of pottery, some grotesquely carved ivory idol, or some fantastic trifle brought to you from this singular fatherland of all fantasy.

   Believe me, with the deepest respect,
     Madame la Duchesse,
        Your affectionate
               Pierre Loti.

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Madame Chrysantheme — Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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