The Great God Pan eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 65 pages of information about The Great God Pan.

Et DIABOLUS incarnate est. Et homo FACTUS est.

III

THE CITY OF RESURRECTIONS

“Herbert!  Good God!  Is it possible?”

“Yes, my name’s Herbert.  I think I know your face, too, but I don’t remember your name.  My memory is very queer.”

“Don’t you recollect Villiers of Wadham?”

“So it is, so it is.  I beg your pardon, Villiers, I didn’t think I was begging of an old college friend.  Good-night.”

“My dear fellow, this haste is unnecessary.  My rooms are close by, but we won’t go there just yet.  Suppose we walk up Shaftesbury Avenue a little way?  But how in heaven’s name have you come to this pass, Herbert?”

“It’s a long story, Villiers, and a strange one too, but you can hear it if you like.”

“Come on, then.  Take my arm, you don’t seem very strong.”

The ill-assorted pair moved slowly up Rupert Street; the one in dirty, evil-looking rags, and the other attired in the regulation uniform of a man about town, trim, glossy, and eminently well-to-do.  Villiers had emerged from his restaurant after an excellent dinner of many courses, assisted by an ingratiating little flask of Chianti, and, in that frame of mind which was with him almost chronic, had delayed a moment by the door, peering round in the dimly-lighted street in search of those mysterious incidents and persons with which the streets of London teem in every quarter and every hour.  Villiers prided himself as a practised explorer of such obscure mazes and byways of London life, and in this unprofitable pursuit he displayed an assiduity which was worthy of more serious employment.  Thus he stood by the lamp-post surveying the passers-by with undisguised curiosity, and with that gravity known only to the systematic diner, had just enunciated in his mind the formula:  “London has been called the city of encounters; it is more than that, it is the city of Resurrections,” when these reflections were suddenly interrupted by a piteous whine at his elbow, and a deplorable appeal for alms.  He looked around in some irritation, and with a sudden shock found himself confronted with the embodied proof of his somewhat stilted fancies.  There, close beside him, his face altered and disfigured by poverty and disgrace, his body barely covered by greasy ill-fitting rags, stood his old friend Charles Herbert, who had matriculated on the same day as himself, with whom he had been merry and wise for twelve revolving terms.  Different occupations and varying interests had interrupted the friendship, and it was six years since Villiers had seen Herbert; and now he looked upon this wreck of a man with grief and dismay, mingled with a certain inquisitiveness as to what dreary chain of circumstances had dragged him down to such a doleful pass.  Villiers felt together with compassion all the relish of the amateur in mysteries, and congratulated himself on his leisurely speculations outside the restaurant.

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The Great God Pan from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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