Edinburgh Picturesque Notes eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 66 pages of information about Edinburgh Picturesque Notes.
and yet there they sit, enchanted, and in damnatory accents pray for each other’s growth in grace.  It would be well if there were no more than two; but the sects in Scotland form a large family of sisters, and the chalk lines are thickly drawn, and run through the midst of many private homes.  Edinburgh is a city of churches, as though it were a place of pilgrimage.  You will see four within a stone-cast at the head of the West Bow.  Some are crowded to the doors; some are empty like monuments; and yet you will ever find new ones in the building.  Hence that surprising clamour of church bells that suddenly breaks out upon the Sabbath morning from Trinity and the sea-skirts to Morningside on the borders of the hills.  I have heard the chimes of Oxford playing their symphony in a golden autumn morning, and beautiful it was to hear.  But in Edinburgh all manner of loud bells join, or rather disjoin, in one swelling, brutal babblement of noise.  Now one overtakes another, and now lags behind it; now five or six all strike on the pained tympanum at the same punctual instant of time, and make together a dismal chord of discord; and now for a second all seem to have conspired to hold their peace.  Indeed, there are not many uproars in this world more dismal than that of the Sabbath bells in Edinburgh:  a harsh ecclesiastical tocsin; the outcry of incongruous orthodoxies, calling on every separate conventicler to put up a protest, each in his own synagogue, against ’right-hand extremes and left-hand defections.’  And surely there are few worse extremes than this extremity of zeal; and few more deplorable defections than this disloyalty to Christian love.  Shakespeare wrote a comedy of ‘Much Ado about Nothing.’  The Scottish nation made a fantastic tragedy on the same subject.  And it is for the success of this remarkable piece that these bells are sounded every Sabbath morning on the hills above the Forth.  How many of them might rest silent in the steeple, how many of these ugly churches might be demolished and turned once more into useful building material, if people who think almost exactly the same thoughts about religion would condescend to worship God under the same roof!  But there are the chalk lines.  And which is to pocket pride, and speak the foremost word?

CHAPTER V. GREYFRIARS.

It was Queen Mary who threw open the gardens of the Grey Friars:  a new and semi-rural cemetery in those days, although it has grown an antiquity in its turn and been superseded by half-a-dozen others.  The Friars must have had a pleasant time on summer evenings; for their gardens were situated to a wish, with the tall castle and the tallest of the castle crags in front.  Even now, it is one of our famous Edinburgh points of view; and strangers are led thither to see, by yet another instance, how strangely the city lies upon her hills.  The enclosure is of an irregular shape; the double church of Old and New Greyfriars stands on the level at the top; a few thorns are dotted here and there, and the ground falls by terrace and steep slope towards the north.  The open shows many slabs and table tombstones; and all round the margin, the place is girt by an array of aristocratic mausoleums appallingly adorned.

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Edinburgh Picturesque Notes from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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