Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, and Homerica eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 271 pages of information about Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, and Homerica.

(ll. 27-47) They sing of the blessed gods and high Olympus and choose to tell of such an one as luck-bringing Hermes above the rest, how he is the swift messenger of all the gods, and how he came to Arcadia, the land of many springs and mother of flocks, there where his sacred place is as god of Cyllene.  For there, though a god, he used to tend curly-fleeced sheep in the service of a mortal man, because there fell on him and waxed strong melting desire to wed the rich-tressed daughter of Dryops, and there he brought about the merry marriage.  And in the house she bare Hermes a dear son who from his birth was marvellous to look upon, with goat’s feet and two horns —­ a noisy, merry-laughing child.  But when the nurse saw his uncouth face and full beard, she was afraid and sprang up and fled and left the child.  Then luck-bringing Hermes received him and took him in his arms:  very glad in his heart was the god.  And he went quickly to the abodes of the deathless gods, carrying the son wrapped in warm skins of mountain hares, and set him down beside Zeus and showed him to the rest of the gods.  Then all the immortals were glad in heart and Bacchie Dionysus in especial; and they called the boy Pan (32) because he delighted all their hearts.

(ll. 48-49) And so hail to you, lord!  I seek your favour with a song.  And now I will remember you and another song also.

XX.  TO HEPHAESTUS (8 lines)

(ll. 1-7) Sing, clear-voiced Muses, of Hephaestus famed for inventions.  With bright-eyed Athene he taught men glorious gifts throughout the world, —­ men who before used to dwell in caves in the mountains like wild beasts.  But now that they have learned crafts through Hephaestus the famed worker, easily they live a peaceful life in their own houses the whole year round.

(l. 8) Be gracious, Hephaestus, and grant me success and prosperity!

XXI.  TO APOLLO (5 lines)

(ll. 1-4) Phoebus, of you even the swan sings with clear voice to the beating of his wings, as he alights upon the bank by the eddying river Peneus; and of you the sweet-tongued minstrel, holding his high-pitched lyre, always sings both first and last.

(l. 5) And so hail to you, lord!  I seek your favour with my song.

XXII.  TO POSEIDON (7 lines)

(ll. 1-5) I begin to sing about Poseidon, the great god, mover of the earth and fruitless sea, god of the deep who is also lord of Helicon and wide Aegae.  A two-fold office the gods allotted you, O Shaker of the Earth, to be a tamer of horses and a saviour of ships!

(ll. 6-7) Hail, Poseidon, Holder of the Earth, dark-haired lord!  O blessed one, be kindly in heart and help those who voyage in ships!

XXIII.  TO THE SON OF CRONOS, MOST HIGH (4 lines)

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Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, and Homerica from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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