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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 271 pages of information about Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, and Homerica.

(ll. 7-9) And so hail to you, Artemis, in my song and to all goddesses as well.  Of you first I sing and with you I begin; now that I have begun with you, I will turn to another song.

X. TO APHRODITE (6 lines)

(ll. 1-3) Of Cytherea, born in Cyprus, I will sing.  She gives kindly gifts to men:  smiles are ever on her lovely face, and lovely is the brightness that plays over it.

(ll. 4-6) Hail, goddess, queen of well-built Salamis and sea-girt Cyprus; grant me a cheerful song.  And now I will remember you and another song also.

XI.  TO ATHENA (5 lines)

(ll. 1-4) Of Pallas Athene, guardian of the city, I begin to sing.  Dread is she, and with Ares she loves deeds of war, the sack of cities and the shouting and the battle.  It is she who saves the people as they go out to war and come back.

(l. 5) Hail, goddess, and give us good fortune with happiness!

XII.  TO HERA (5 lines)

(ll. 1-5) I sing of golden-throned Hera whom Rhea bare.  Queen of the immortals is she, surpassing all in beauty:  she is the sister and the wife of loud-thundering Zeus, —­ the glorious one whom all the blessed throughout high Olympus reverence and honour even as Zeus who delights in thunder.

XIII.  TO DEMETER (3 lines)

(ll. 1-2) I begin to sing of rich-haired Demeter, awful goddess, of her and of her daughter lovely Persephone.

(l. 3) Hail, goddess!  Keep this city safe, and govern my song.

XIV.  TO THE MOTHER OF THE GODS (6 lines)

(ll. 1-5) I prithee, clear-voiced Muse, daughter of mighty Zeus, sing of the mother of all gods and men.  She is well-pleased with the sound of rattles and of timbrels, with the voice of flutes and the outcry of wolves and bright-eyed lions, with echoing hills and wooded coombes.

(l. 6) And so hail to you in my song and to all goddesses as well!

XV.  TO HERACLES THE LION-HEARTED (9 lines)

(ll. 1-8) I will sing of Heracles, the son of Zeus and much the mightiest of men on earth.  Alcmena bare him in Thebes, the city of lovely dances, when the dark-clouded Son of Cronos had lain with her.  Once he used to wander over unmeasured tracts of land and sea at the bidding of King Eurystheus, and himself did many deeds of violence and endured many; but now he lives happily in the glorious home of snowy Olympus, and has neat-ankled Hebe for his wife.

(l. 9) Hail, lord, son of Zeus!  Give me success and prosperity.

XVI.  TO ASCLEPIUS (5 lines)

(ll. 1-4) I begin to sing of Asclepius, son of Apollo and healer of sicknesses.  In the Dotian plain fair Coronis, daughter of King Phlegyas, bare him, a great joy to men, a soother of cruel pangs.

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