Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

The patient grew calmer every instant, and presently said, “You needn’t tie me.  I shall go quietly!” Without trouble, we came back to the house.  I feel there is something ominous in his calm, and shall not forget this night.

LUCY WESTENRA’S DIARY

Hillingham, 24 August.—­I must imitate Mina, and keep writing things down.  Then we can have long talks when we do meet.  I wonder when it will be.  I wish she were with me again, for I feel so unhappy.  Last night I seemed to be dreaming again just as I was at Whitby.  Perhaps it is the change of air, or getting home again.  It is all dark and horrid to me, for I can remember nothing.  But I am full of vague fear, and I feel so weak and worn out.  When Arthur came to lunch he looked quite grieved when he saw me, and I hadn’t the spirit to try to be cheerful.  I wonder if I could sleep in mother’s room tonight.  I shall make an excuse to try.

25 August.—­Another bad night.  Mother did not seem to take to my proposal.  She seems not too well herself, and doubtless she fears to worry me.  I tried to keep awake, and succeeded for a while, but when the clock struck twelve it waked me from a doze, so I must have been falling asleep.  There was a sort of scratching or flapping at the window, but I did not mind it, and as I remember no more, I suppose I must have fallen asleep.  More bad dreams.  I wish I could remember them.  This morning I am horribly weak.  My face is ghastly pale, and my throat pains me.  It must be something wrong with my lungs, for I don’t seem to be getting air enough.  I shall try to cheer up when Arthur comes, or else I know he will be miserable to see me so.

LETTER, ARTHUR TO DR. SEWARD

“Albemarle Hotel, 31 August

“My dear Jack,

“I want you to do me a favour.  Lucy is ill, that is she has no special disease, but she looks awful, and is getting worse every day.  I have asked her if there is any cause, I not dare to ask her mother, for to disturb the poor lady’s mind about her daughter in her present state of health would be fatal.  Mrs. Westenra has confided to me that her doom is spoken, disease of the heart, though poor Lucy does not know it yet.  I am sure that there is something preying on my dear girl’s mind.  I am almost distracted when I think of her.  To look at her gives me a pang.  I told her I should ask you to see her, and though she demurred at first, I know why, old fellow, she finally consented.  It will be a painful task for you, I know, old friend, but it is for her sake, and I must not hesitate to ask, or you to act.  You are to come to lunch at Hillingham tomorrow, two o’clock, so as not to arouse any suspicion in Mrs. Westenra, and after lunch Lucy will take an opportunity of being alone with you.  I am filled with anxiety, and want to consult with you alone as soon as I can after you have seen her.  Do not fail!

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.