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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

Lucy

P.S.—­I need not tell you this is a secret. 
Goodnight again.  L.

LETTER, LUCY WESTENRA TO MINA MURRAY

24 May

My dearest Mina,

Thanks, and thanks, and thanks again for your sweet letter.  It was so nice to be able to tell you and to have your sympathy.

My dear, it never rains but it pours.  How true the old proverbs are.  Here am I, who shall be twenty in September, and yet I never had a proposal till today, not a real proposal, and today I had three.  Just fancy!  Three proposals in one day!  Isn’t it awful!  I feel sorry, really and truly sorry, for two of the poor fellows.  Oh, Mina, I am so happy that I don’t know what to do with myself.  And three proposals!  But, for goodness’ sake, don’t tell any of the girls, or they would be getting all sorts of extravagant ideas, and imagining themselves injured and slighted if in their very first day at home they did not get six at least.  Some girls are so vain!  You and I, Mina dear, who are engaged and are going to settle down soon soberly into old married women, can despise vanity.  Well, I must tell you about the three, but you must keep it a secret, dear, from every one except, of course, Jonathan.  You will tell him, because I would, if I were in your place, certainly tell Arthur.  A woman ought to tell her husband everything.  Don’t you think so, dear?  And I must be fair.  Men like women, certainly their wives, to be quite as fair as they are.  And women, I am afraid, are not always quite as fair as they should be.

Well, my dear, number One came just before lunch.  I told you of him, Dr. John Seward, the lunatic asylum man, with the strong jaw and the good forehead.  He was very cool outwardly, but was nervous all the same.  He had evidently been schooling himself as to all sorts of little things, and remembered them, but he almost managed to sit down on his silk hat, which men don’t generally do when they are cool, and then when he wanted to appear at ease he kept playing with a lancet in a way that made me nearly scream.  He spoke to me, Mina, very straightforwardly.  He told me how dear I was to him, though he had known me so little, and what his life would be with me to help and cheer him.  He was going to tell me how unhappy he would be if I did not care for him, but when he saw me cry he said he was a brute and would not add to my present trouble.  Then he broke off and asked if I could love him in time, and when I shook my head his hands trembled, and then with some hesitation he asked me if I cared already for any one else.  He put it very nicely, saying that he did not want to wring my confidence from me, but only to know, because if a woman’s heart was free a man might have hope.  And then, Mina, I felt a sort of duty to tell him that there was some one.  I only told him that much, and then he stood up, and he looked very strong and very grave as he took both my hands in his and said he hoped I would be happy, and that If I ever wanted a friend I must count him one of my best.

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