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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

19 May.—­I am surely in the toils.  Last night the Count asked me in the suavest tones to write three letters, one saying that my work here was nearly done, and that I should start for home within a few days, another that I was starting on the next morning from the time of the letter, and the third that I had left the castle and arrived at Bistritz.  I would fain have rebelled, but felt that in the present state of things it would be madness to quarrel openly with the Count whilst I am so absolutely in his power.  And to refuse would be to excite his suspicion and to arouse his anger.  He knows that I know too much, and that I must not live, lest I be dangerous to him.  My only chance is to prolong my opportunities.  Something may occur which will give me a chance to escape.  I saw in his eyes something of that gathering wrath which was manifest when he hurled that fair woman from him.  He explained to me that posts were few and uncertain, and that my writing now would ensure ease of mind to my friends.  And he assured me with so much impressiveness that he would countermand the later letters, which would be held over at Bistritz until due time in case chance would admit of my prolonging my stay, that to oppose him would have been to create new suspicion.  I therefore pretended to fall in with his views, and asked him what dates I should put on the letters.

He calculated a minute, and then said, “The first should be June 12, the second June 19, and the third June 29.”

I know now the span of my life.  God help me!

28 May.—­There is a chance of escape, or at any rate of being able to send word home.  A band of Szgany have come to the castle, and are encamped in the courtyard.  These are gipsies.  I have notes of them in my book.  They are peculiar to this part of the world, though allied to the ordinary gipsies all the world over.  There are thousands of them in Hungary and Transylvania, who are almost outside all law.  They attach themselves as a rule to some great noble or boyar, and call themselves by his name.  They are fearless and without religion, save superstition, and they talk only their own varieties of the Romany tongue.

I shall write some letters home, and shall try to get them to have them posted.  I have already spoken to them through my window to begin acquaintanceship.  They took their hats off and made obeisance and many signs, which however, I could not understand any more than I could their spoken language . . .

I have written the letters.  Mina’s is in shorthand, and I simply ask Mr. Hawkins to communicate with her.  To her I have explained my situation, but without the horrors which I may only surmise.  It would shock and frighten her to death were I to expose my heart to her.  Should the letters not carry, then the Count shall not yet know my secret or the extent of my knowledge. . . .

I have given the letters.  I threw them through the bars of my window with a gold piece, and made what signs I could to have them posted.  The man who took them pressed them to his heart and bowed, and then put them in his cap.  I could do no more.  I stole back to the study, and began to read.  As the Count did not come in, I have written here . . .

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