Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

“Oh, Professor, why ask me to do what you know I can’t?  I don’t remember anything.”  Then, seeing the look of amazement on our faces, she said, turning from one to the other with a troubled look, “What have I said?  What have I done?  I know nothing, only that I was lying here, half asleep, and heard you say ‘go on! speak, I command you!’ It seemed so funny to hear you order me about, as if I were a bad child!”

“Oh, Madam Mina,” he said, sadly, “it is proof, if proof be needed, of how I love and honour you, when a word for your good, spoken more earnest than ever, can seem so strange because it is to order her whom I am proud to obey!”

The whistles are sounding.  We are nearing Galatz.  We are on fire with anxiety and eagerness.

MINA HARKER’S JOURNAL

30 October.—­Mr. Morris took me to the hotel where our rooms had been ordered by telegraph, he being the one who could best be spared, since he does not speak any foreign language.  The forces were distributed much as they had been at Varna, except that Lord Godalming went to the Vice Consul, as his rank might serve as an immediate guarantee of some sort to the official, we being in extreme hurry.  Jonathan and the two doctors went to the shipping agent to learn particulars of the arrival of the Czarina Catherine.

Later.—­Lord Godalming has returned.  The Consul is away, and the Vice Consul sick.  So the routine work has been attended to by a clerk.  He was very obliging, and offered to do anything in his power.

JONATHAN HARKER’S JOURNAL

30 October.—­At nine o’clock Dr. Van Helsing, Dr. Seward, and I called on Messrs. Mackenzie & Steinkoff, the agents of the London firm of Hapgood.  They had received a wire from London, in answer to Lord Godalming’s telegraphed request, asking them to show us any civility in their power.  They were more than kind and courteous, and took us at once on board the Czarina Catherine, which lay at anchor out in the river harbor.  There we saw the Captain, Donelson by name, who told us of his voyage.  He said that in all his life he had never had so favourable a run.

“Man!” he said, “but it made us afeard, for we expect it that we should have to pay for it wi’ some rare piece o’ ill luck, so as to keep up the average.  It’s no canny to run frae London to the Black Sea wi’ a wind ahint ye, as though the Deil himself were blawin’ on yer sail for his ain purpose.  An’ a’ the time we could no speer a thing.  Gin we were nigh a ship, or a port, or a headland, a fog fell on us and travelled wi’ us, till when after it had lifted and we looked out, the deil a thing could we see.  We ran by Gibraltar wi’ oot bein’ able to signal.  An’ til we came to the Dardanelles and had to wait to get our permit to pass, we never were within hail o’ aught.  At first I inclined to slack off sail and beat about till the fog was lifted.  But whiles, I thocht that if the Deil was minded to get us into the Black Sea quick, he was like to do it whether we would or no.  If we had a quick voyage it would be no to our miscredit wi’ the owners, or no hurt to our traffic, an’ the Old Mon who had served his ain purpose wad be decently grateful to us for no hinderin’ him.”

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.