Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

He told them what Mina had said, and went on.  “In the morning we shall leave for Varna.  We have now to deal with a new factor, Madam Mina.  Oh, but her soul is true.  It is to her an agony to tell us so much as she has done.  But it is most right, and we are warned in time.  There must be no chance lost, and in Varna we must be ready to act the instant when that ship arrives.”

“What shall we do exactly?” asked Mr. Morris laconically.

The Professor paused before replying, “We shall at the first board that ship.  Then, when we have identified the box, we shall place a branch of the wild rose on it.  This we shall fasten, for when it is there none can emerge, so that at least says the superstition.  And to superstition must we trust at the first.  It was man’s faith in the early, and it have its root in faith still.  Then, when we get the opportunity that we seek, when none are near to see, we shall open the box, and . . . and all will be well.”

“I shall not wait for any opportunity,” said Morris.  “When I see the box I shall open it and destroy the monster, though there were a thousand men looking on, and if I am to be wiped out for it the next moment!” I grasped his hand instinctively and found it as firm as a piece of steel.  I think he understood my look.  I hope he did.

“Good boy,” said Dr. Van Helsing.  “Brave boy.  Quincey is all man.  God bless him for it.  My child, believe me none of us shall lag behind or pause from any fear.  I do but say what we may do . . . what we must do.  But, indeed, indeed we cannot say what we may do.  There are so many things which may happen, and their ways and their ends are so various that until the moment we may not say.  We shall all be armed, in all ways.  And when the time for the end has come, our effort shall not be lack.  Now let us today put all our affairs in order.  Let all things which touch on others dear to us, and who on us depend, be complete.  For none of us can tell what, or when, or how, the end may be.  As for me, my own affairs are regulate, and as I have nothing else to do, I shall go make arrangements for the travel.  I shall have all tickets and so forth for our journey.”

There was nothing further to be said, and we parted.  I shall now settle up all my affairs of earth, and be ready for whatever may come.

Later.—­It is done.  My will is made, and all complete.  Mina if she survive is my sole heir.  If it should not be so, then the others who have been so good to us shall have remainder.

It is now drawing towards the sunset.  Mina’s uneasiness calls my attention to it.  I am sure that there is something on her mind which the time of exact sunset will reveal.  These occasions are becoming harrowing times for us all.  For each sunrise and sunset opens up some new danger, some new pain, which however, may in God’s will be means to a good end.  I write all these things in the diary since my darling must not hear them now.  But if it may be that she can see them again, they shall be ready.  She is calling to me.

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.