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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

As she stopped speaking he leaped to his feet, almost tearing his hand from hers as he spoke.

“May God give him into my hand just for long enough to destroy that earthly life of him which we are aiming at.  If beyond it I could send his soul forever and ever to burning hell I would do it!”

“Oh, hush!  Oh, hush in the name of the good God.  Don’t say such things, Jonathan, my husband, or you will crush me with fear and horror.  Just think, my dear . . .  I have been thinking all this long, long day of it . . . that . . . perhaps . . . some day . . .  I, too, may need such pity, and that some other like you, and with equal cause for anger, may deny it to me!  Oh, my husband!  My husband, indeed I would have spared you such a thought had there been another way.  But I pray that God may not have treasured your wild words, except as the heart-broken wail of a very loving and sorely stricken man.  Oh, God, let these poor white hairs go in evidence of what he has suffered, who all his life has done no wrong, and on whom so many sorrows have come.”

We men were all in tears now.  There was no resisting them, and we wept openly.  She wept, too, to see that her sweeter counsels had prevailed.  Her husband flung himself on his knees beside her, and putting his arms round her, hid his face in the folds of her dress.  Van Helsing beckoned to us and we stole out of the room, leaving the two loving hearts alone with their God.

Before they retired the Professor fixed up the room against any coming of the Vampire, and assured Mrs. Harker that she might rest in peace.  She tried to school herself to the belief, and manifestly for her husband’s sake, tried to seem content.  It was a brave struggle, and was, I think and believe, not without its reward.  Van Helsing had placed at hand a bell which either of them was to sound in case of any emergency.  When they had retired, Quincey, Godalming, and I arranged that we should sit up, dividing the night between us, and watch over the safety of the poor stricken lady.  The first watch falls to Quincey, so the rest of us shall be off to bed as soon as we can.

Godalming has already turned in, for his is the second watch.  Now that my work is done I, too, shall go to bed.

JONATHAN HARKER’S JOURNAL

3-4 October, close to midnight.—­I thought yesterday would never end.  There was over me a yearning for sleep, in some sort of blind belief that to wake would be to find things changed, and that any change must now be for the better.  Before we parted, we discussed what our next step was to be, but we could arrive at no result.  All we knew was that one earth box remained, and that the Count alone knew where it was.  If he chooses to lie hidden, he may baffle us for years.  And in the meantime, the thought is too horrible, I dare not think of it even now.  This I know, that if ever there was a woman who was all perfection,

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