Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

With sad hearts we came back to my house, where we found Mrs. Harker waiting us, with an appearance of cheerfulness which did honour to her bravery and unselfishness.  When she saw our faces, her own became as pale as death.  For a second or two her eyes were closed as if she were in secret prayer.

And then she said cheerfully, “I can never thank you all enough.  Oh, my poor darling!”

As she spoke, she took her husband’s grey head in her hands and kissed it.

“Lay your poor head here and rest it.  All will yet be well, dear!  God will protect us if He so will it in His good intent.”  The poor fellow groaned.  There was no place for words in his sublime misery.

We had a sort of perfunctory supper together, and I think it cheered us all up somewhat.  It was, perhaps, the mere animal heat of food to hungry people, for none of us had eaten anything since breakfast, or the sense of companionship may have helped us, but anyhow we were all less miserable, and saw the morrow as not altogether without hope.

True to our promise, we told Mrs. Harker everything which had passed.  And although she grew snowy white at times when danger had seemed to threaten her husband, and red at others when his devotion to her was manifested, she listened bravely and with calmness.  When we came to the part where Harker had rushed at the Count so recklessly, she clung to her husband’s arm, and held it tight as though her clinging could protect him from any harm that might come.  She said nothing, however, till the narration was all done, and matters had been brought up to the present time.

Then without letting go her husband’s hand she stood up amongst us and spoke.  Oh, that I could give any idea of the scene.  Of that sweet, sweet, good, good woman in all the radiant beauty of her youth and animation, with the red scar on her forehead, of which she was conscious, and which we saw with grinding of our teeth, remembering whence and how it came.  Her loving kindness against our grim hate.  Her tender faith against all our fears and doubting.  And we, knowing that so far as symbols went, she with all her goodness and purity and faith, was outcast from God.

“Jonathan,” she said, and the word sounded like music on her lips it was so full of love and tenderness, “Jonathan dear, and you all my true, true friends, I want you to bear something in mind through all this dreadful time.  I know that you must fight.  That you must destroy even as you destroyed the false Lucy so that the true Lucy might live hereafter.  But it is not a work of hate.  That poor soul who has wrought all this misery is the saddest case of all.  Just think what will be his joy when he, too, is destroyed in his worser part that his better part may have spiritual immortality.  You must be pitiful to him, too, though it may not hold your hands from his destruction.”

As she spoke I could see her husband’s face darken and draw together, as though the passion in him were shriveling his being to its core.  Instinctively the clasp on his wife’s hand grew closer, till his knuckles looked white.  She did not flinch from the pain which I knew she must have suffered, but looked at him with eyes that were more appealing than ever.

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.