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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

There was hope in his words, and comfort.  And they made for resignation.  Mina and I both felt so, and simultaneously we each took one of the old man’s hands and bent over and kissed it.  Then without a word we all knelt down together, and all holding hands, swore to be true to each other.  We men pledged ourselves to raise the veil of sorrow from the head of her whom, each in his own way, we loved.  And we prayed for help and guidance in the terrible task which lay before us.  It was then time to start.  So I said farewell to Mina, a parting which neither of us shall forget to our dying day, and we set out.

To one thing I have made up my mind.  If we find out that Mina must be a vampire in the end, then she shall not go into that unknown and terrible land alone.  I suppose it is thus that in old times one vampire meant many.  Just as their hideous bodies could only rest in sacred earth, so the holiest love was the recruiting sergeant for their ghastly ranks.

We entered Carfax without trouble and found all things the same as on the first occasion.  It was hard to believe that amongst so prosaic surroundings of neglect and dust and decay there was any ground for such fear as already we knew.  Had not our minds been made up, and had there not been terrible memories to spur us on, we could hardly have proceeded with our task.  We found no papers, or any sign of use in the house.  And in the old chapel the great boxes looked just as we had seen them last.

Dr. Van Helsing said to us solemnly as we stood before him, “And now, my friends, we have a duty here to do.  We must sterilize this earth, so sacred of holy memories, that he has brought from a far distant land for such fell use.  He has chosen this earth because it has been holy.  Thus we defeat him with his own weapon, for we make it more holy still.  It was sanctified to such use of man, now we sanctify it to God.”

As he spoke he took from his bag a screwdriver and a wrench, and very soon the top of one of the cases was thrown open.  The earth smelled musty and close, but we did not somehow seem to mind, for our attention was concentrated on the Professor.  Taking from his box a piece of the Sacred Wafer he laid it reverently on the earth, and then shutting down the lid began to screw it home, we aiding him as he worked.

One by one we treated in the same way each of the great boxes, and left them as we had found them to all appearance.  But in each was a portion of the Host.  When we closed the door behind us, the Professor said solemnly, “So much is already done.  It may be that with all the others we can be so successful, then the sunset of this evening may shine of Madam Mina’s forehead all white as ivory and with no stain!”

As we passed across the lawn on our way to the station to catch our train we could see the front of the asylum.  I looked eagerly, and in the window of my own room saw Mina.  I waved my hand to her, and nodded to tell that our work there was successfully accomplished.  She nodded in reply to show that she understood.  The last I saw, she was waving her hand in farewell.  It was with a heavy heart that we sought the station and just caught the train, which was steaming in as we reached the platform.  I have written this in the train.

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