Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

When I had finished, he said, “I am glad that it is old and big.  I myself am of an old family, and to live in a new house would kill me.  A house cannot be made habitable in a day, and after all, how few days go to make up a century.  I rejoice also that there is a chapel of old times.  We Transylvanian nobles love not to think that our bones may lie amongst the common dead.  I seek not gaiety nor mirth, not the bright voluptuousness of much sunshine and sparkling waters which please the young and gay.  I am no longer young, and my heart, through weary years of mourning over the dead, is not attuned to mirth.  Moreover, the walls of my castle are broken.  The shadows are many, and the wind breathes cold through the broken battlements and casements.  I love the shade and the shadow, and would be alone with my thoughts when I may.”  Somehow his words and his look did not seem to accord, or else it was that his cast of face made his smile look malignant and saturnine.

Presently, with an excuse, he left me, asking me to pull my papers together.  He was some little time away, and I began to look at some of the books around me.  One was an atlas, which I found opened naturally to England, as if that map had been much used.  On looking at it I found in certain places little rings marked, and on examining these I noticed that one was near London on the east side, manifestly where his new estate was situated.  The other two were Exeter, and Whitby on the Yorkshire coast.

It was the better part of an hour when the Count returned.  “Aha!” he said.  “Still at your books?  Good!  But you must not work always.  Come!  I am informed that your supper is ready.”  He took my arm, and we went into the next room, where I found an excellent supper ready on the table.  The Count again excused himself, as he had dined out on his being away from home.  But he sat as on the previous night, and chatted whilst I ate.  After supper I smoked, as on the last evening, and the Count stayed with me, chatting and asking questions on every conceivable subject, hour after hour.  I felt that it was getting very late indeed, but I did not say anything, for I felt under obligation to meet my host’s wishes in every way.  I was not sleepy, as the long sleep yesterday had fortified me, but I could not help experiencing that chill which comes over one at the coming of the dawn, which is like, in its way, the turn of the tide.  They say that people who are near death die generally at the change to dawn or at the turn of the tide.  Anyone who has when tired, and tied as it were to his post, experienced this change in the atmosphere can well believe it.  All at once we heard the crow of the cock coming up with preternatural shrillness through the clear morning air.

Count Dracula, jumping to his feet, said, “Why there is the morning again!  How remiss I am to let you stay up so long.  You must make your conversation regarding my dear new country of England less interesting, so that I may not forget how time flies by us,” and with a courtly bow, he quickly left me.

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.