Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

With their going it seemed as if some evil presence had departed, for the dogs frisked about and barked merrily as they made sudden darts at their prostrate foes, and turned them over and over and tossed them in the air with vicious shakes.  We all seemed to find our spirits rise.  Whether it was the purifying of the deadly atmosphere by the opening of the chapel door, or the relief which we experienced by finding ourselves in the open I know not, but most certainly the shadow of dread seemed to slip from us like a robe, and the occasion of our coming lost something of its grim significance, though we did not slacken a whit in our resolution.  We closed the outer door and barred and locked it, and bringing the dogs with us, began our search of the house.  We found nothing throughout except dust in extraordinary proportions, and all untouched save for my own footsteps when I had made my first visit.  Never once did the dogs exhibit any symptom of uneasiness, and even when we returned to the chapel they frisked about as though they had been rabbit hunting in a summer wood.

The morning was quickening in the east when we emerged from the front.  Dr. Van Helsing had taken the key of the hall door from the bunch, and locked the door in orthodox fashion, putting the key into his pocket when he had done.

“So far,” he said, “our night has been eminently successful.  No harm has come to us such as I feared might be and yet we have ascertained how many boxes are missing.  More than all do I rejoice that this, our first, and perhaps our most difficult and dangerous, step has been accomplished without the bringing thereinto our most sweet Madam Mina or troubling her waking or sleeping thoughts with sights and sounds and smells of horror which she might never forget.  One lesson, too, we have learned, if it be allowable to argue a particulari, that the brute beasts which are to the Count’s command are yet themselves not amenable to his spiritual power, for look, these rats that would come to his call, just as from his castle top he summon the wolves to your going and to that poor mother’s cry, though they come to him, they run pell-mell from the so little dogs of my friend Arthur.  We have other matters before us, other dangers, other fears, and that monster . . .  He has not used his power over the brute world for the only or the last time tonight.  So be it that he has gone elsewhere.  Good!  It has given us opportunity to cry ‘check’ in some ways in this chess game, which we play for the stake of human souls.  And now let us go home.  The dawn is close at hand, and we have reason to be content with our first night’s work.  It may be ordained that we have many nights and days to follow, if full of peril, but we must go on, and from no danger shall we shrink.”

The house was silent when we got back, save for some poor creature who was screaming away in one of the distant wards, and a low, moaning sound from Renfield’s room.  The poor wretch was doubtless torturing himself, after the manner of the insane, with needless thoughts of pain.

Follow Us on Facebook