Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

“You have,” I said frankly, but at the same time, as I felt, brutally.

There was a considerable pause, and then he said slowly, “Then I suppose I must only shift my ground of request.  Let me ask for this concession, boon, privilege, what you will.  I am content to implore in such a case, not on personal grounds, but for the sake of others.  I am not at liberty to give you the whole of my reasons, but you may, I assure you, take it from me that they are good ones, sound and unselfish, and spring from the highest sense of duty.

“Could you look, sir, into my heart, you would approve to the full the sentiments which animate me.  Nay, more, you would count me amongst the best and truest of your friends.”

Again he looked at us all keenly.  I had a growing conviction that this sudden change of his entire intellectual method was but yet another phase of his madness, and so determined to let him go on a little longer, knowing from experience that he would, like all lunatics, give himself away in the end.  Van Helsing was gazing at him with a look of utmost intensity, his bushy eyebrows almost meeting with the fixed concentration of his look.  He said to Renfield in a tone which did not surprise me at the time, but only when I thought of it afterwards, for it was as of one addressing an equal, “Can you not tell frankly your real reason for wishing to be free tonight?  I will undertake that if you will satisfy even me, a stranger, without prejudice, and with the habit of keeping an open mind, Dr. Seward will give you, at his own risk and on his own responsibility, the privilege you seek.”

He shook his head sadly, and with a look of poignant regret on his face.  The Professor went on, “Come, sir, bethink yourself.  You claim the privilege of reason in the highest degree, since you seek to impress us with your complete reasonableness.  You do this, whose sanity we have reason to doubt, since you are not yet released from medical treatment for this very defect.  If you will not help us in our effort to choose the wisest course, how can we perform the duty which you yourself put upon us?  Be wise, and help us, and if we can we shall aid you to achieve your wish.”

He still shook his head as he said, “Dr. Van Helsing, I have nothing to say.  Your argument is complete, and if I were free to speak I should not hesitate a moment, but I am not my own master in the matter.  I can only ask you to trust me.  If I am refused, the responsibility does not rest with me.”

I thought it was now time to end the scene, which was becoming too comically grave, so I went towards the door, simply saying, “Come, my friends, we have work to do.  Goodnight.”

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.