Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

“He can do all these things, yet he is not free.  Nay, he is even more prisoner than the slave of the galley, than the madman in his cell.  He cannot go where he lists, he who is not of nature has yet to obey some of nature’s laws, why we know not.  He may not enter anywhere at the first, unless there be some one of the household who bid him to come, though afterwards he can come as he please.  His power ceases, as does that of all evil things, at the coming of the day.

“Only at certain times can he have limited freedom.  If he be not at the place whither he is bound, he can only change himself at noon or at exact sunrise or sunset.  These things we are told, and in this record of ours we have proof by inference.  Thus, whereas he can do as he will within his limit, when he have his earth-home, his coffin-home, his hell-home, the place unhallowed, as we saw when he went to the grave of the suicide at Whitby, still at other time he can only change when the time come.  It is said, too, that he can only pass running water at the slack or the flood of the tide.  Then there are things which so afflict him that he has no power, as the garlic that we know of, and as for things sacred, as this symbol, my crucifix, that was amongst us even now when we resolve, to them he is nothing, but in their presence he take his place far off and silent with respect.  There are others, too, which I shall tell you of, lest in our seeking we may need them.

“The branch of wild rose on his coffin keep him that he move not from it, a sacred bullet fired into the coffin kill him so that he be true dead, and as for the stake through him, we know already of its peace, or the cut off head that giveth rest.  We have seen it with our eyes.

“Thus when we find the habitation of this man-that-was, we can confine him to his coffin and destroy him, if we obey what we know.  But he is clever.  I have asked my friend Arminius, of Buda-Pesth University, to make his record, and from all the means that are, he tell me of what he has been.  He must, indeed, have been that Voivode Dracula who won his name against the Turk, over the great river on the very frontier of Turkeyland.  If it be so, then was he no common man, for in that time, and for centuries after, he was spoken of as the cleverest and the most cunning, as well as the bravest of the sons of the ’land beyond the forest.’  That mighty brain and that iron resolution went with him to his grave, and are even now arrayed against us.  The Draculas were, says Arminius, a great and noble race, though now and again were scions who were held by their coevals to have had dealings with the Evil One.  They learned his secrets in the Scholomance, amongst the mountains over Lake Hermanstadt, where the devil claims the tenth scholar as his due.  In the records are such words as ‘stregoica’ witch, ‘ordog’ and ‘pokol’ Satan and hell, and in one manuscript this very Dracula is spoken of as ‘wampyr,’ which we all understand too well.  There have been from the loins of this very one great men and good women, and their graves make sacred the earth where alone this foulness can dwell.  For it is not the least of its terrors that this evil thing is rooted deep in all good, in soil barren of holy memories it cannot rest.”

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.