Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

I nodded, and he went on.

“I don’t quite see the drift of it, but you people are all so good and kind, and have been working so earnestly and so energetically, that all I can do is to accept your ideas blindfold and try to help you.  I have had one lesson already in accepting facts that should make a man humble to the last hour of his life.  Besides, I know you loved my Lucy . . .”

Here he turned away and covered his face with his hands.  I could hear the tears in his voice.  Mr. Morris, with instinctive delicacy, just laid a hand for a moment on his shoulder, and then walked quietly out of the room.  I suppose there is something in a woman’s nature that makes a man free to break down before her and express his feelings on the tender or emotional side without feeling it derogatory to his manhood.  For when Lord Godalming found himself alone with me he sat down on the sofa and gave way utterly and openly.  I sat down beside him and took his hand.  I hope he didn’t think it forward of me, and that if he ever thinks of it afterwards he never will have such a thought.  There I wrong him.  I know he never will.  He is too true a gentleman.  I said to him, for I could see that his heart was breaking, “I loved dear Lucy, and I know what she was to you, and what you were to her.  She and I were like sisters, and now she is gone, will you not let me be like a sister to you in your trouble?  I know what sorrows you have had, though I cannot measure the depth of them.  If sympathy and pity can help in your affliction, won’t you let me be of some little service, for Lucy’s sake?”

In an instant the poor dear fellow was overwhelmed with grief.  It seemed to me that all that he had of late been suffering in silence found a vent at once.  He grew quite hysterical, and raising his open hands, beat his palms together in a perfect agony of grief.  He stood up and then sat down again, and the tears rained down his cheeks.  I felt an infinite pity for him, and opened my arms unthinkingly.  With a sob he laid his head on my shoulder and cried like a wearied child, whilst he shook with emotion.

We women have something of the mother in us that makes us rise above smaller matters when the mother spirit is invoked.  I felt this big sorrowing man’s head resting on me, as though it were that of a baby that some day may lie on my bosom, and I stroked his hair as though he were my own child.  I never thought at the time how strange it all was.

After a little bit his sobs ceased, and he raised himself with an apology, though he made no disguise of his emotion.  He told me that for days and nights past, weary days and sleepless nights, he had been unable to speak with any one, as a man must speak in his time of sorrow.  There was no woman whose sympathy could be given to him, or with whom, owing to the terrible circumstance with which his sorrow was surrounded, he could speak freely.

“I know now how I suffered,” he said, as he dried his eyes, “but I do not know even yet, and none other can ever know, how much your sweet sympathy has been to me today.  I shall know better in time, and believe me that, though I am not ungrateful now, my gratitude will grow with my understanding.  You will let me be like a brother, will you not, for all our lives, for dear Lucy’s sake?”

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.