Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

“Go on,” said Arthur hoarsely.  “Tell me what I am to do.”

“Take this stake in your left hand, ready to place to the point over the heart, and the hammer in your right.  Then when we begin our prayer for the dead, I shall read him, I have here the book, and the others shall follow, strike in God’s name, that so all may be well with the dead that we love and that the UnDead pass away.”

Arthur took the stake and the hammer, and when once his mind was set on action his hands never trembled nor even quivered.  Van Helsing opened his missal and began to read, and Quincey and I followed as well as we could.

Arthur placed the point over the heart, and as I looked I could see its dint in the white flesh.  Then he struck with all his might.

The thing in the coffin writhed, and a hideous, blood-curdling screech came from the opened red lips.  The body shook and quivered and twisted in wild contortions.  The sharp white teeth champed together till the lips were cut, and the mouth was smeared with a crimson foam.  But Arthur never faltered.  He looked like a figure of Thor as his untrembling arm rose and fell, driving deeper and deeper the mercy-bearing stake, whilst the blood from the pierced heart welled and spurted up around it.  His face was set, and high duty seemed to shine through it.  The sight of it gave us courage so that our voices seemed to ring through the little vault.

And then the writhing and quivering of the body became less, and the teeth seemed to champ, and the face to quiver.  Finally it lay still.  The terrible task was over.

The hammer fell from Arthur’s hand.  He reeled and would have fallen had we not caught him.  The great drops of sweat sprang from his forehead, and his breath came in broken gasps.  It had indeed been an awful strain on him, and had he not been forced to his task by more than human considerations he could never have gone through with it.  For a few minutes we were so taken up with him that we did not look towards the coffin.  When we did, however, a murmur of startled surprise ran from one to the other of us.  We gazed so eagerly that Arthur rose, for he had been seated on the ground, and came and looked too, and then a glad strange light broke over his face and dispelled altogether the gloom of horror that lay upon it.

There, in the coffin lay no longer the foul Thing that we had so dreaded and grown to hate that the work of her destruction was yielded as a privilege to the one best entitled to it, but Lucy as we had seen her in life, with her face of unequalled sweetness and purity.  True that there were there, as we had seen them in life, the traces of care and pain and waste.  But these were all dear to us, for they marked her truth to what we knew.  One and all we felt that the holy calm that lay like sunshine over the wasted face and form was only an earthly token and symbol of the calm that was to reign for ever.

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.