Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

“Here, there is one thing which is different from all recorded.  Here is some dual life that is not as the common.  She was bitten by the vampire when she was in a trance, sleep-walking, oh, you start.  You do not know that, friend John, but you shall know it later, and in trance could he best come to take more blood.  In trance she dies, and in trance she is UnDead, too.  So it is that she differ from all other.  Usually when the UnDead sleep at home,” as he spoke he made a comprehensive sweep of his arm to designate what to a vampire was ‘home’, “their face show what they are, but this so sweet that was when she not UnDead she go back to the nothings of the common dead.  There is no malign there, see, and so it make hard that I must kill her in her sleep.”

This turned my blood cold, and it began to dawn upon me that I was accepting Van Helsing’s theories.  But if she were really dead, what was there of terror in the idea of killing her?

He looked up at me, and evidently saw the change in my face, for he said almost joyously, “Ah, you believe now?”

I answered, “Do not press me too hard all at once.  I am willing to accept.  How will you do this bloody work?”

“I shall cut off her head and fill her mouth with garlic, and I shall drive a stake through her body.”

It made me shudder to think of so mutilating the body of the woman whom I had loved.  And yet the feeling was not so strong as I had expected.  I was, in fact, beginning to shudder at the presence of this being, this UnDead, as Van Helsing called it, and to loathe it.  Is it possible that love is all subjective, or all objective?

I waited a considerable time for Van Helsing to begin, but he stood as if wrapped in thought.  Presently he closed the catch of his bag with a snap, and said,

“I have been thinking, and have made up my mind as to what is best.  If I did simply follow my inclining I would do now, at this moment, what is to be done.  But there are other things to follow, and things that are thousand times more difficult in that them we do not know.  This is simple.  She have yet no life taken, though that is of time, and to act now would be to take danger from her forever.  But then we may have to want Arthur, and how shall we tell him of this?  If you, who saw the wounds on Lucy’s throat, and saw the wounds so similar on the child’s at the hospital, if you, who saw the coffin empty last night and full today with a woman who have not change only to be more rose and more beautiful in a whole week, after she die, if you know of this and know of the white figure last night that brought the child to the churchyard, and yet of your own senses you did not believe, how then, can I expect Arthur, who know none of those things, to believe?

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.