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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

“My dear Dr. Van Helsing,

“A thousand thanks for your kind letter, which has taken a great weight off my mind.  And yet, if it be true, what terrible things there are in the world, and what an awful thing if that man, that monster, be really in London!  I fear to think.  I have this moment, whilst writing, had a wire from Jonathan, saying that he leaves by the 6:25 tonight from Launceston and will be here at 10:18, so that I shall have no fear tonight.  Will you, therefore, instead of lunching with us, please come to breakfast at eight o’clock, if this be not too early for you?  You can get away, if you are in a hurry, by the 10:30 train, which will bring you to Paddington by 2:35.  Do not answer this, as I shall take it that, if I do not hear, you will come to breakfast.

“Believe me,

“Your faithful and grateful friend,

“Mina Harker.”

JONATHAN HARKER’S JOURNAL

26 September.—­I thought never to write in this diary again, but the time has come.  When I got home last night Mina had supper ready, and when we had supped she told me of Van Helsing’s visit, and of her having given him the two diaries copied out, and of how anxious she has been about me.  She showed me in the doctor’s letter that all I wrote down was true.  It seems to have made a new man of me.  It was the doubt as to the reality of the whole thing that knocked me over.  I felt impotent, and in the dark, and distrustful.  But, now that I know, I am not afraid, even of the Count.  He has succeeded after all, then, in his design in getting to London, and it was he I saw.  He has got younger, and how?  Van Helsing is the man to unmask him and hunt him out, if he is anything like what Mina says.  We sat late, and talked it over.  Mina is dressing, and I shall call at the hotel in a few minutes and bring him over.

He was, I think, surprised to see me.  When I came into the room where he was, and introduced myself, he took me by the shoulder, and turned my face round to the light, and said, after a sharp scrutiny,

“But Madam Mina told me you were ill, that you had had a shock.”

It was so funny to hear my wife called ‘Madam Mina’ by this kindly, strong-faced old man.  I smiled, and said, “I was ill, I have had a shock, but you have cured me already.”

“And how?”

“By your letter to Mina last night.  I was in doubt, and then everything took a hue of unreality, and I did not know what to trust, even the evidence of my own senses.  Not knowing what to trust, I did not know what to do, and so had only to keep on working in what had hitherto been the groove of my life.  The groove ceased to avail me, and I mistrusted myself.  Doctor, you don’t know what it is to doubt everything, even yourself.  No, you don’t, you couldn’t with eyebrows like yours.”

He seemed pleased, and laughed as he said, “So!  You are a physiognomist.  I learn more here with each hour.  I am with so much pleasure coming to you to breakfast, and, oh, sir, you will pardon praise from an old man, but you are blessed in your wife.”

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