Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

It was half-past two o’clock when the knock came.  I took my courage a deux mains and waited.  In a few minutes Mary opened the door, and announced “Dr. Van Helsing”.

I rose and bowed, and he came towards me, a man of medium weight, strongly built, with his shoulders set back over a broad, deep chest and a neck well balanced on the trunk as the head is on the neck.  The poise of the head strikes me at once as indicative of thought and power.  The head is noble, well-sized, broad, and large behind the ears.  The face, clean-shaven, shows a hard, square chin, a large resolute, mobile mouth, a good-sized nose, rather straight, but with quick, sensitive nostrils, that seem to broaden as the big bushy brows come down and the mouth tightens.  The forehead is broad and fine, rising at first almost straight and then sloping back above two bumps or ridges wide apart, such a forehead that the reddish hair cannot possibly tumble over it, but falls naturally back and to the sides.  Big, dark blue eyes are set widely apart, and are quick and tender or stern with the man’s moods.  He said to me,

“Mrs. Harker, is it not?” I bowed assent.

“That was Miss Mina Murray?” Again I assented.

“It is Mina Murray that I came to see that was friend of that poor dear child Lucy Westenra.  Madam Mina, it is on account of the dead that I come.”

“Sir,” I said, “you could have no better claim on me than that you were a friend and helper of Lucy Westenra.”  And I held out my hand.  He took it and said tenderly,

“Oh, Madam Mina, I know that the friend of that poor little girl must be good, but I had yet to learn . . .”  He finished his speech with a courtly bow.  I asked him what it was that he wanted to see me about, so he at once began.

“I have read your letters to Miss Lucy.  Forgive me, but I had to begin to inquire somewhere, and there was none to ask.  I know that you were with her at Whitby.  She sometimes kept a diary, you need not look surprised, Madam Mina.  It was begun after you had left, and was an imitation of you, and in that diary she traces by inference certain things to a sleep-walking in which she puts down that you saved her.  In great perplexity then I come to you, and ask you out of your so much kindness to tell me all of it that you can remember.”

“I can tell you, I think, Dr. Van Helsing, all about it.”

“Ah, then you have good memory for facts, for details?  It is not always so with young ladies.”

“No, doctor, but I wrote it all down at the time.  I can show it to you if you like.”

“Oh, Madam Mina, I well be grateful.  You will do me much favour.”

I could not resist the temptation of mystifying him a bit, I suppose it is some taste of the original apple that remains still in our mouths, so I handed him the shorthand diary.  He took it with a grateful bow, and said, “May I read it?”

“If you wish,” I answered as demurely as I could.  He opened it, and for an instant his face fell.  Then he stood up and bowed.

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Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.