Dracula eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

“Nay, sir, you are my guest.  It is late, and my people are not available.  Let me see to your comfort myself.”  He insisted on carrying my traps along the passage, and then up a great winding stair, and along another great passage, on whose stone floor our steps rang heavily.  At the end of this he threw open a heavy door, and I rejoiced to see within a well-lit room in which a table was spread for supper, and on whose mighty hearth a great fire of logs, freshly replenished, flamed and flared.

The Count halted, putting down my bags, closed the door, and crossing the room, opened another door, which led into a small octagonal room lit by a single lamp, and seemingly without a window of any sort.  Passing through this, he opened another door, and motioned me to enter.  It was a welcome sight.  For here was a great bedroom well lighted and warmed with another log fire, also added to but lately, for the top logs were fresh, which sent a hollow roar up the wide chimney.  The Count himself left my luggage inside and withdrew, saying, before he closed the door.

“You will need, after your journey, to refresh yourself by making your toilet.  I trust you will find all you wish.  When you are ready, come into the other room, where you will find your supper prepared.”

The light and warmth and the Count’s courteous welcome seemed to have dissipated all my doubts and fears.  Having then reached my normal state, I discovered that I was half famished with hunger.  So making a hasty toilet, I went into the other room.

I found supper already laid out.  My host, who stood on one side of the great fireplace, leaning against the stonework, made a graceful wave of his hand to the table, and said,

“I pray you, be seated and sup how you please.  You will I trust, excuse me that I do not join you, but I have dined already, and I do not sup.”

I handed to him the sealed letter which Mr. Hawkins had entrusted to me.  He opened it and read it gravely.  Then, with a charming smile, he handed it to me to read.  One passage of it, at least, gave me a thrill of pleasure.

“I must regret that an attack of gout, from which malady I am a constant sufferer, forbids absolutely any travelling on my part for some time to come.  But I am happy to say I can send a sufficient substitute, one in whom I have every possible confidence.  He is a young man, full of energy and talent in his own way, and of a very faithful disposition.  He is discreet and silent, and has grown into manhood in my service.  He shall be ready to attend on you when you will during his stay, and shall take your instructions in all matters.”

The count himself came forward and took off the cover of a dish, and I fell to at once on an excellent roast chicken.  This, with some cheese and a salad and a bottle of old tokay, of which I had two glasses, was my supper.  During the time I was eating it the Count asked me many questions as to my journey, and I told him by degrees all I had experienced.

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Project Gutenberg
Dracula from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.