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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 484 pages of information about Dracula.

Without an instant’s notice he made straight at me.  He had a dinner knife in his hand, and as I saw he was dangerous, I tried to keep the table between us.  He was too quick and too strong for me, however, for before I could get my balance he had struck at me and cut my left wrist rather severely.

Before he could strike again, however, I got in my right hand and he was sprawling on his back on the floor.  My wrist bled freely, and quite a little pool trickled on to the carpet.  I saw that my friend was not intent on further effort, and occupied myself binding up my wrist, keeping a wary eye on the prostrate figure all the time.  When the attendants rushed in, and we turned our attention to him, his employment positively sickened me.  He was lying on his belly on the floor licking up, like a dog, the blood which had fallen from my wounded wrist.  He was easily secured, and to my surprise, went with the attendants quite placidly, simply repeating over and over again, “The blood is the life!  The blood is the life!”

I cannot afford to lose blood just at present.  I have lost too much of late for my physical good, and then the prolonged strain of Lucy’s illness and its horrible phases is telling on me.  I am over excited and weary, and I need rest, rest, rest.  Happily Van Helsing has not summoned me, so I need not forego my sleep.  Tonight I could not well do without it.

TELEGRAM, VAN HELSING, ANTWERP, TO SEWARD, CARFAX

(Sent to Carfax, Sussex, as no county given, delivered late by twenty-two hours.)

17 September.—­Do not fail to be at Hilllingham tonight.  If not watching all the time, frequently visit and see that flowers are as placed, very important, do not fail.  Shall be with you as soon as possible after arrival.

DR. SEWARD’S DIARY

18 September.—­Just off train to London.  The arrival of Van Helsing’s telegram filled me with dismay.  A whole night lost, and I know by bitter experience what may happen in a night.  Of course it is possible that all may be well, but what may have happened?  Surely there is some horrible doom hanging over us that every possible accident should thwart us in all we try to do.  I shall take this cylinder with me, and then I can complete my entry on Lucy’s phonograph.

MEMORANDUM LEFT BY LUCY WESTENRA

17 September, Night.—­I write this and leave it to be seen, so that no one may by any chance get into trouble through me.  This is an exact record of what took place tonight.  I feel I am dying of weakness, and have barely strength to write, but it must be done if I die in the doing.

I went to bed as usual, taking care that the flowers were placed as Dr. Van Helsing directed, and soon fell asleep.

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