Ragged Lady — Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 168 pages of information about Ragged Lady Volume 2.

XV.

Mrs. Lander went to a hotel in New York where she had been in the habit of staying with her husband, on their way South or North.  The clerk knew her, and shook hands with her across the register, and said she could have her old rooms if she wanted them; the bell-boy who took up their hand-baggage recalled himself to her; the elevator-boy welcomed her with a smile of remembrance.

Since she was already up, from coming off the sleeping-car, she had no excuse for not going to breakfast like other people; and she went with Clementina to the dining-room, where the head-waiter, who found them places, spoke with an outlandish accent, and the waiter who served them had a parlance that seemed superficially English, but was inwardly something else; there was even a touch in the cooking of the familiar dishes, that needed translation for the girl’s inexperienced palate.  She was finding a refuge in the strangeness of everything, when she was startled by the sound of a familiar voice calling, “Clementina Claxon!  Well, I was sure all along it was you, and I determined I wouldn’t stand it another minute.  Why, child, how you have changed!  Why, I declare you are quite a woman!  When did you come?  How pretty you are!” Mrs. Milray took Clementina in her arms and kissed her in proof of her admiration before the whole breakfast room.  She was very nice to Mrs. Lander, too, who, when Clementina introduced them, made haste to say that Clementina was there on a visit with her.  Mrs. Milray answered that she envied her such a visitor as Miss Claxon, and protested that she should steal her away for a visit to herself, if Mr. Milray was not so much in love with her that it made her jealous.  “Mr. Milray has to have his breakfast in his room,” she explained to Clementina.  “He’s not been so well, since he lost his mother.  Yes,” she said, with decorous solemnity, “I’m still in mourning for her,” and Clementina saw that she was in a tempered black.  “She died last year, and now I’m taking Mr. Milray abroad to see if it won’t cheer him up a little.  Are you going South for the winter?” she inquired, politely, of Mrs. Lander.  “I wish I was going,” she said, when Mrs. Lander guessed they should go, later on.  “Well, you must come in and see me all you can, Clementina; and I shall have the pleasure of calling upon you,” she added to Mrs. Lander with state that was lost in the soubrette-like volatility of her flight from them the next moment.  “Goodness, I forgot all about Mr. Milray’s breakfast!” She ran back to the table she had left on the other side of the room.

“Who is that, Clementina?” asked Mrs. Lander, on their way to their rooms.  Clementina explained as well as she could, and Mrs. Lander summed up her feeling in the verdict, “Well, she’s a lady, if ever I saw a lady; and you don’t see many of ’em, nowadays.”

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Ragged Lady — Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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