East Lynne eBook

Ellen Wood (author)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 794 pages of information about East Lynne.

“My daughter, Mr. Carlyle, the Lady Isabel.”

They took their seats at the table, Lord Mount Severn at its head, in spite of his gout and his footstool.  And the young lady and Mr. Carlyle opposite each other.  Mr. Carlyle had not deemed himself a particular admirer of women’s beauty, but the extraordinary loveliness of the young girl before him nearly took away his senses and his self-possession.  Yet it was not so much the perfect contour or the exquisite features that struck him, or the rich damask of the delicate cheek, or the luxuriant falling hair; no, it was the sweet expression of the soft dark eyes.  Never in his life had he seen eyes so pleasing.  He could not keep his gaze from her, and he became conscious, as he grew more familiar with her face, that there was in its character a sad, sorrowful look; only at times was it to be noticed, when the features were at repose, and it lay chiefly in the very eyes he was admiring.  Never does this unconsciously mournful expression exist, but it is a sure index of sorrow and suffering; but Mr. Carlyle understood it not.  And who could connect sorrow with the anticipated brilliant future of Isabel Vane?

“Isabel,” observed the earl, “you are dressed.”

“Yes, papa.  Not to keep old Mrs. Levison waiting tea.  She likes to take it early, and I know Mrs. Vane must have kept her waiting dinner.  It was half-past six when she drove from here.”

“I hope you will not be late to-night, Isabel.”

“It depends upon Mrs. Vane.”

“Then I am sure you will be.  When the young ladies in this fashionable world of ours turn night into day, it is a bad thing for their roses.  What say you, Mr. Carlyle?”

Mr. Carlyle glanced at the roses on the cheeks opposite to him; they looked too fresh and bright to fade lightly.

At the conclusion of dinner a maid entered the room with a white cashmere mantle, placing it over the shoulders of her young lady, as she said the carriage was waiting.

Lady Isabel advanced to the earl.  “Good-bye, papa.”

“Good-night, my love,” he answered, drawing her toward him, and kissing her sweet face.  “Tell Mrs. Vane I will not have you kept out till morning hours.  You are but a child yet.  Mr. Carlyle, will you ring?  I am debarred from seeing my daughter to the carriage.”

“If your lordship will allow me—­if Lady Isabel will pardon the attendance of one little used to wait upon young ladies, I shall be proud to see her to her carriage,” was the somewhat confused answer of Mr. Carlyle as he touched the bell.

The earl thanked him, and the young lady smiled, and Mr. Carlyle conducted her down the broad, lighted staircase and stood bareheaded by the door of the luxurious chariot, and handed her in.  She put out her hand in her frank, pleasant manner, as she wished him good night.  The carriage rolled on its way, and Mr. Carlyle returned to the earl.

“Well, is she not a handsome girl?” he demanded.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
East Lynne from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook